Your Voice power create change - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Your Voice has the Power to Create Change

LGBT EmployeesReview/rate your employers in support of LGBTQ Corporate Equality.

With a mask of anonymity, you can:

Any Company/Organization

Any Size – Large or Small

Any Location – Worldwide

Your Voice – Anonymously

Our Future

With the majority of US states not granting legal protections and rights for LGBT people along with this administration doing everything they can roll back the few protections in place, it’s left to companies to lead the charge by providing an LGBTQ-friendly work environment through corporate policies and benefits.

OutBüro is a Glassdoor.com-like resource where you may share your experiences what it’s like working for your current and recent past employers – up to 5 years past. 

Why Rate Your Employer?

  • Studies have proven that the more diversity-focused a company is the more profitable they are 
  • Current measurements of Corporate LGBT Equality is Fortune 1000 level only and HR/Marketing department head SELF REPORTED with no/zero EMPLOYEE FEEDBACK.  
  • Your review may provide public accolades for progress already achieved by their current focus on LGBTQ Corporate Equaity
  • Shine a light on problems – Is the company/organization not quite living up to LGBTQ Workplace Equality?  Let them know anonymously.  
  • You are making it a better environment for yourself, current and future co-workers  
  • You are providing a resource for job seekers to make informed decisions about where to work 
  • You are helping the company’s employer branding
  • You are helping it become a more profitable company improving shareholder value  
  • You are a SUPERHERO

OutBüro is striving to be a global resource for the LGBTQ community by empowering LGBTQ people with a voice to influence business, company and corporate culture to improve the work-life for all both now and in the future. It is a feedback system for companies to gauge their real progress toward full LGBTQ workplace equality.

Every company listing in the CompanyReviews Employer Listing is required to indicate if the company has the following policies, benefits, and programs in place or not.

  • Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Policy
  • Gender Identity Non-Discrimination Policy
  • Domestic Partner Benefits
  • Transgender-Inclusive Benefits
  • Has an LGBT Employee Resource Group
  • Public Commitment to LGBT Equality 
  • LGBT Inclusion Competency Training
  • If it operates in more than one country has the same policies and benefits globally 
  • Requires all vendors and contractors to have similar policies and benefits  Indicate the number of diversity in management
  • Indicate the number of LGBT in management 

Are LGBT-Friendly Policies Enough?

Simple answer – No.  Having LGBTQ-friendly policies are wonderful and appreciated – but not the full picture. Remember, in the US Sexual Harassment policies have been in place since the late 70’s and still today it continues to happen. Just turn on the news. Now consider all the cases that do not make the news and those that go unreported. Discrimination and harassment of LGBTQ employees are no different. Just having policies is not enough. We must provide visibility and insight to make the change and ensure it is effective in its goals to protect.

Grab Your Spandex, Cape, and Mask 

Review your employer today

JPMorgan Chase Co - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

LGBT Employees Rate JPMorgan Chase as an Employer

Coming out is hard. Coming out at work is another level for many. Having an employer that is LGBT+ supportive goes a long way to support the individual and the community by creating visibility and awareness. Join us and rate your employer anonymously from your LGBT perspective at www.OutBuro.com.

Any employer. Any size. Anywhere in the world.

LGBT Friendly policies are wonderful and appreciated.  They, however, do not 100% guarantee an LGBT+ work-life experience of unicorns and rainbows.  If sexual harassment policies that have been in place in the US since the late 1970’s and weekly news of high profile cases are evidence.  It’s clear that policies alone are not enough.  Additionally, self-reporting by management is not enough.   All things to be and maintain greatness needs a level of checks and balances.  Management needs to hear what they are doing great as well as what needs attention.  We allow this while maintaining your anonymity.  Just keep it professional with facts.  (See below: Is OutBüro a site for disgruntled LGBT current and past employees to just rant and vent?)

Click the JP Morgan Chase logo to be taken to their company rating listing.  Just log in or create a free account.  Be sure to review the Company Rating Guidelines as well as the articles below for a good overview.


Do you work for another company and would like to review them?  AWESOME.

Navigate to the OutBüro Companies and Reviews page.  Search for your recent past and current employers.  If not present just add them using the Employee option for free.  Then when it’s approved search for the company and then ADD A REVIEW.  Simple as that.  Remember this portion of the site maintains your anonymity.  Just don’t provide too much detail in your review that the employer can easily identify you if you believe it will be an issue.

 

https://www.outburo.com/be-a-superhero-your-voice-has-the-power-to-create-change/

Company Reviews – Good for Companies and Their LGBTQ Employees

Is OutBüro a site for disgruntled LGBT current and past employees to just rant and vent?

 

#lgbtrights #gayissues #pride #LGBT #Diversity #DiversityandInclusion #gay #lesbian #recruiting #recruitmenttools #recruitmentadvertising #employability #fortune500 #jobsearch #jobsatisfaction #jobseeking #hrpolicies #sexualityeducation #nondiscriminationtesting #equality #equities #equalopportunities #equalityanddiversity #humanresources #humanrights

OutBuro - Study finds LGBT people less likely to be hired paid less and not promoted - LGBT Employer Company Reviews Directory GLBT Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Networking Community Job Portal Board

Study finds LGBT people less likely to be hired, paid less, and not promoted

A study recently published in the “Archives of Sexual Behaviour” conducted researchers at the University Surrey in the UK introduced voice samples and images with backgrounds removed of homosexual (gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer) alongside the heterosexual persons, to a panel of heterosexual men and women. Participants weren’t informed of the subjects sexual orientation but permitted to openly guess their sexual orientation purely on the voice and photo of their face. The premise of the study was the heterosexual participants were recruiters and hiring managers and was instructed to evaluate the employability of the candidates. The participants were asked to respond to 5 statements on a scale of 1-5 as well as to provide their view of the perceived monthly wages they believed would be fair for the candidate.

They found that when participants perceived subjects to be homosexual (LGBT) – real or not, the believed them to be inadequate as leaders.

For male study candidates, voice and speech rather than physical looks influenced heavily on if they have been deemed appropriate for the job. Researchers discovered that projecting a “heterosexual-sounding” instead of the “gay-sounding” voice generated the belief that the study candidate normally displays masculine traits, which subsequently improved their perceived suitability for the job and the justification for a higher wage and advancement. The study discovered that heterosexuals believed gay men ought to be paid less than their heterosexual counterparts.

Perceived lesbian applicants were correlated with a deficiency of femininity and deemed as gender non-conforming. They received significantly less favorable evaluation compared to heterosexual perceived counterparts.

Dr. Fabio Fasoli explained: “These results reveal that the mere sound of a voice is enough to trigger stereotyping denying gay-sounding along with lesbian-sounding speakers that the benefit which is deemed typical of the gender.”

This study is demonstrating that despite all of the work to reduce workplace discrimination against the perceived and real LGBT workers and professionals, heterosexual individuals subconsciously typecast a person before getting to know them and make decisions to discriminate against them. This study highlights the real struggles at work and their career prospects. Heterosexuals can say that they pay their staff based on their qualifications, however, the basis of the employee/s value is being directly influenced by learned prejudices and stereotypes perpetuating inequality and oppression.

In another study participants were requested to listen to only the voices of two distinct speakers of one neutral content sentence and then asked to assess the speakers’ probable character traits and individual interests (i.e. sports, arts, areas of study and career). The traits and interests were manipulated in order to uncover stereotyping regarded as “generally manly” (e.g., soccer) and “typically feminine” (e.g., dancing). Additionally, participants were asked which of those speakers they’d select as a friend. The study was done in two parts. The first studying males and the second females.

Researchers found that participants attributed womanly traits into the perceived gay males compared to perceived heterosexual male speakers. Perceived lesbian speakers were far much more likely to be associated with manly traits than with feminine traits.

When asked which of these speakers’ participants would select as an acquaintance/friend, researchers discovered that male participants were far more likely to steer clear of gay-sounding speakers. This indicates the subtle yet real effect of how purely the voice and speech patterns contributes to social exclusion of homosexual people both in the workplace and in general society.

Dr. Fasoli added: “This study demonstrates that unacceptable levels of discrimination, be they subconscious or conscious, still exists in our society, and we need to do more to tackle the discrimination faced by the LGBT community.”

More information: Fabio Fasoli et al, Gay- and Lesbian-Sounding Auditory Cues Elicit Stereotyping and Discrimination, Archives of Sexual Behavior (2017). DOI: 10.1007/s10508-017-0962-0

Journal reference: Archives of Sexual Behavior – Springer Science+Business Media –
http://www.springer.com/public+health/journal/10508

University of Surrey – http://www.surrey.ac.uk/

OutBuro - LGBT Employer Company Reviews Ratings Directory GBLT Professionals Networking Gay Owned Lesbian Transgender Bisexual Community Job Portal Board Postings Entrepreneurs Career Seeker Workplace Culture

OutBuro - 3 Ways You Should Be Using OutBüro in Recruiting LGBT Candidates - Employer Company Reviews Directory GLBT Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Queer Professional Networking Community Job Portal Board

3 Ways You Should Be Using OutBüro in Recruiting LGBT Candidates

With over a growing network reach of over 63 thousand gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer professionals, OutBüro is a huge resource that will assist you to attract and close top-tier diversity talent. Candidates utilize the website to research companies, compose and read testimonials, employer reviews/ratings, locate new job opportunities and professional networking. As a company, efficiently managing your business’s existence on OutBüro will help you put your very best foot forward with those candidates validating your LGBT-friendly policies and work culture.

1. Showcase your company brand

When you add/claim your business listing you are able to:

  • Add/edit a business description featuring LGBT recruiting-centric content as much as possible
  • Photographs
  • Videos
  • Indicate the LGBT important policies in place
  • Indicate your diversity vendor practices
  • Invite all your current employees to review/rate you on OutBüro to reveal candidates exactly what it is like to work in your business
  • Add your OutBüro Company Review rating to your company HR home page with a link to it on OutBüro
  • Write press releases showcasing your OutBüro score and LGBT inclusive work environment
  • Publish content directly on the OutBüro blog – activities and employee spotlights for example
  • Directly network with OutBüro members and within our OutBüro on LinkedIn group
  • Potential to be featured in OutBüro member communications

Participating in the first and only Company Reviews/Ratings for the LGBT global community can enable you to magnify your quality candidate reach and acquisition.

2. Monitor and respond to reviews/ratings feedback

OutBüro is a go-to website for LGBT employees to provide anonymous company reviews/ratings with both general work topics and LGBT related interests. Fifty-two percent of active job seekers browse employee testimonials at the onset of their job hunt before talking with a business recruiter or hiring manager.

Make it a point to track and react to reviews and opinions on interviews since they’re posted. Thank people for their time submitting a review, no matter if it is negative or positive overall, and handle any complaints noted. When some does raise a negative experience working at your company, it may be a legitimate opportunity to improve. Others might be an issue of culture match–so do everything you can to become responsive and transparent.

On average, 9 in 10 job seekers find company reviews useful when studying about a prospective new employer. Further, 70 percent state their feeling of a business is enhanced after viewing them positively respond to a negative review/rating critique. It demonstrates that the company is engaged and cares.

3. Post Jobs

When diversity LGBT candidates are exploring your company brand, make it simple for them to discover relevant job opportunities directly on OutBüro. Eighty-nine percent of OutBüro users are actively searching for new career opportunities or might be open to new opportunities if contacted. Since job seekers have likely researched the company prior to submitting their application, they are normally higher quality candidates than people from other job boards that are not focused on the LGBT working force and professional community.

OutBüro is a new site yet, founded on proven tactics to be an important instrument for applicants and, due to our focused growing member base, can be a rather valuable tool for companies like yours. Candidates utilize the website in order to investigate companies they are thinking about working at. Your active presence can go a long way in making the difference in attracting new talent and retaining your current employees, versus losing them to your rival.

OutBuro - LGBT Employer Company Reviews Ratings Directory GBLT Professionals Networking Gay Owned Lesbian Transgender Bisexual Community Job Portal Board Postings Entrepreneurs Career Seeker Workplace Culture

OutBuro - LGBT Workplace Equality – 5 Examples to Help Allies Understand - LGBT Employer Company Reviews Directory GLBT Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Queer Professional Community Job Portal Board

LGBT Workplace Equality – 5 Examples to Help Allies Understand

Ally companies put LGBT-friendly policies and business practices into place. But they don’t stop there knowing that policies are not enough. They create a workplace culture of inclusiveness and celebrate the differences that make each employee great. They actively recruit LGBTQ employees and welcome constructive feedback on how they are doing can how they can improve.

Employment discrimination and LGBT workplace equality have always been something of a personal issue and now my it is my focus with OutBüro – The LGBTQ Employer Reviews, Job Portal & Professional and Entrepreneur Community and it’s LinkedIn group, the largest LGBT professional networking group on LinkedIn.

My Personal Story

Dennis Velco - OutBüro - The LGBTQ Employer Reviews, Job Portal & Professional and Entrepreneur Community Job Portal Board Resume CV Database Diversity and Inclusing Recruiting CareerProfessionally, I’d say that I’ve always been conservatively out. I have never made my sexuality a huge deal wearing it on my sleeve, but I have never tried to overtly hide it either – besides my time in the US Army in the late 80’s. When I’d start new jobs or client projects I’d be invited to the social after work functions. Then as my sexuality became apparent those invites were reduced to only the super gay-friendly staff who wanted to do all the gay-things in the city. So the limited inclusiveness was layered with stereotypes of going to gay dance clubs and helping them shop for home décor, clothes, and gifts. Sure I’ve got style but at the time didn’t realize how I was being excluded and superficially used.

In my work and projects, I felt like I always had to go above and beyond the norm to prove myself to my employers and clients. I even had to deal with sexual harassment from a female senior executive that knew I was gay but seemed to feel that was a challenge she wanted to concur. Right now what are you thinking? Check yourself. Are you thinking, “poor him a woman was hitting on him”? If so, that’s a problem.

It became so bad I loathed going to the office, my days were filled with trying to avoid her and her excuses to be at my desk where she’d lean over from behind to point at my computer screen so that she could rub her breast against my back. This was coupled with many other innuendos and overt comments several times a week on how she liked how my pants fit and which ones didn’t hug my butt or crotch. I had no way to voice my frustration, anxiety, and anger too. No one took me seriously. When I tried to raise my concerns and issues I was literally laughed at by the Human Resource manager. He told me to toughen up and that he wished that executive was interested in him. REALLY With the rude and crude gay jokes from many male team members and the overt sexual harassment from the female top executive, my work-life was stressful and ultimately had to leave that employer. I felt I had no recourse. It was a nightmare.

This caused me to enter corporate consulting where my Fortune 1000 and government clients changed every few months. I put myself in a position of swooping in, doing my job and leaving so that I was nowhere long enough to have it matter. If it was bad, as it was several more time, I knew I had an exit and on to the next project. After a couple years of living out of a suitcase and hotel rooms, I again began to hate my work-life and my life in general with no roots and no real connections. It was difficult to make and maintain friendships and relationships traveling 75-90% of my work-life for 12 years. It was isolating.

Corporate LGBT-Friendly Policies

Today, corporations are leading the charge of LGBT rights and protections for employees. Companies of all sizes are implementing LGBT-friendly policies that include:

• Sexual orientation non-discrimination policy
• Gender identity non-discrimination policy
• Domestic partner benefits
• Transgender-inclusive benefits
• LGBTQ inclusive education

I share the above story of being sexually harassed to point out that in the United States Sexual Harassment policies have been in place since the mid-70’s. Yet it still happens today. Not only to women but also to men like me with both female and male perpetrators. My own incident may have happened quite some time ago, but just turn on any news station of your choice and within a week’s time you are sure to see a high profile case in the news today – right now. This clearly demonstrates that having company policies alone are not enough to remove and eliminate the root problem, change minds or culture.

Why Will LGBT-Discrimination Remain an Issue

I’d like to concentrate on the larger picture and examine why irrespective of anti-discrimination policies and legislative changes, LGBTQ employment discrimination will stay economically divisive, socially permissible and sadly common. Naturally gaining heterosexual allies to recognize this issue as a legitimate and continuing struggle for everyone regardless of sexual orientation is paramount to lasting equality for all. It all boils down to getting to know others and trying to empathize with their perspective. We have to keep in mind it isn’t LGBTQ people that are responsible for homophobia, thus ponder the sociological ecosystem of implicit homophobia that still does not permit queer people to thrive within it.

During my business travels working in hundreds of companies and government agencies I and found that my queer colleagues have nearly uniformly been and are more dedicated to performance and excellence in comparison to our heterosexual counterparts. This is not new or news. It’s fairly common knowledge. Why? It seems that in addition to overcoming any economic hurdles, their particular internalized homophobic programming and assorted trauma connected with a multitude of other societal disadvantages, disapproval, and rejection, they continue to be cautious and quite concerned about how others view about them to a much higher degree than their heterosexual peers. They are addressing a reality that their best will not be good enough, it will be discounted, simply because of who they are. Having experienced this in myself and observing so many others, I believe this bears “real-world” workplace significance.

Undermining Statements From Human Resources and Management

In an uninformed and apathetic manner, I’ve had the below statements made to me numerous times along my career journey. We need to re-frame the understanding of how gay, lesbian, bisexual transgender and queers struggle (not an exhaustive list):

1) Are you sure it was discrimination?
In other words: “Aren’t you just playing the gay card because it’s easier than nursing a bruised ego?” This is an invalidation that stems from a lack of desire to listen, learn and expend some true effort to assess the actual situation. Playing ones part within a discriminating culture means you don’t have to actively discriminate, however, you can certainly assist by remaining quite yourself and further silencing and demoralizing those who object to oppression. With this action, you also don’t have to stop and evaluate the experiences of other people in systems that you might incidentally thrive in, and therefore have no personal objections to. Allies do not show up for the party and then try to argue that the battle is not constant and affects everyone in the workplace. Thoughtfully listen to the full story, even if it shatters your own insecurities and past learned beliefs. Don’t enforce your narrative into it and emphasize your vantage point as the universal default. Become self-aware of when you are doing so and realize that it is not helpful and in fact perpetuates discrimination or worse.

2) Discrimination will be a hard thing to prove.
If an organization discriminates against a person, it’s the organization that must establish in court that it did not discriminate. Why is it so easily deemed that there ought to be a different set of rules for LGBTQ people, implying that it is up to them to prove that they are not lying, omitting facts or being oversensitive? Queer folks are actually all exceptional individuals. This thinking negates the fact that the injustice is being carried out by the perpetrator and not the victim. It dismisses the possibility that not all queer folks can financially afford to challenge discrimination in a court of law. Allies could educate themselves on systems of oppression and verses supporting dismissive statements.

3) But women – or insert race/gender/religion/nationality here – are discriminated against too.
If we are attempting to change a culture of discrimination specifically against queer people of all genders, races, nationalities, and heritage, it’s very diminishing to try and argue that there are simply more important problems, and by assuming gender/race/religious/nationality equality is explicitly heterosexual. Queer equality crosses all other equality categories. Listening is a really important part of supporting. We might use listening to build a sense of common purpose, silently recognizing similarities and then sharing approaches instead of falling into the trap of compartmentalized divisive thinking. Listen, get to know and understand your fellow human and co-worker.

4) Women are discriminated against all of the time. You are a man, so toughen up.
This type of statement is indeed binary, and once again fails to comprehend both why and how gay men and women are discriminated against so broadly and effectively. When you are a guy with perceived feminine qualities or a woman with perceived masculine traits, then gender stereotype fetishization and glorification of male masculinity and female femininity is used to discount, ridicule and isolate individuals and groups. Often a “hetero-passable” receive a pass or partial acceptance because they “fit” the environment cultural norm. This causes the employee to feel devalued again feeding into the idea that they have to work harder to prove themselves to be worthy.

5) You seem very angry. You may not wish to alienate or anger straight people.
I never want to purposely anger anyone, per se. However, I do want to upset the damaging hierarchies and power systems that all of us so effortlessly accept and preserve without any people ever receiving any real advantage from them. Frustration can lead to anger. But put yourself in that person’s perspective. Would you be frustrated and/or angry if the situation was directed at you? Oppressed people are generally exhausted from persevering it for the time until they’ve reached their tipping point to bring it to your attention. It is likely not an isolated event that has pushed them to the point of finally reaching out for help. Listen, analysis, empathize and rationally decide actions to take to address the current situation and prevent it from happening to others in the future.

Summary

Allies must acknowledge personal accountability, empathize with another person’s situation and then attempt to modify their thoughts and actions to grow from new knowledge and personal connections. Allies question their past learned beliefs and accept that their own thoughts and ideas about others may need to change. They take a proactive approach to empower and affect change within themselves, within coworkers and within the companies and organizations they work in and participate in.

Related Articles

Be a Superhero – Your Voice has the Power to Create Change

Company Reviews – Good for Companies and Their LGBTQ Employees

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