4 LGBTQ Workplace Equality Issues and Steps to Inclusion - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity

4 LGBTQ Workplace Equality Issues and Steps to Inclusion

Today still over half the U.S. states lack full legal protection for LGBTQ people. Regardless of politics or laws in the state you do business, companies large and small can take positive action to protect their LGBTQ employees by celebrating diversity, inclusion and creating a welcoming work environment. Studies have shown that companies that support and promote an LGBTQ inclusive work-culture thrive and their bottom line benefits. With 72% of LGBT people experience mental health issues due to their work environment your actions can make a huge difference in your employee’s lives. We hope to be a spark for your company to embrace inclusion and diversity for your current and future LGBTQ employees while reducing your risk exposure. Did you know that a recent study found that 29% of American’s under 30 years old consider themselves hetero-flexible? Having LGBTQ friendly policies and work culture has far-reaching impact on your entire talent base. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of this article for 12 more steps to demonstrate your LGBTQ inclusive work culture.

Below is a list of the 4 common LGBTQ workplace equality issues along with thoughts on how to solve them:

#1 – Health Insurance Does Not Cover Domestic or Same-Sex Partners

Having basic healthcare is the foundation of benefits all employees seek. A significant portion of American heterosexual employees who have access to health insurance through their employers also have access to opposite-sex spousal/common-law spouse coverage – but for same-sex couples, coverage has historically been limited, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. This has been a struggle for the LGBTQ community. Two Supreme Court rulings (United States v Windsor in 2013 and Obergefell v Hodges in 2015) changed the legal landscape for same-sex couples and opened doors for greater access to health insurance through the workplace.

Improvement Step: Review your current health insurance plan to see if it allows enrollment for same-sex married and/or non-married domestic partners. Most major health insurance providers today in the US, Canada, Europe and other countries offer domestic partner coverage. If not, seek a plan that does. This will give all of your employees and their families equal access to health care. For equal treatment, you may consider allowing heterosexual domestic partners the same equal benefits as well. The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) encourages employers to treat all beneficiaries equally when requesting documentation. If an employer requires documentation for partner benefits, they should request the same level of documentation for spousal benefits,” states HRC. Annotate your LGBTQ friendly company policies on OutBüro to attract quality candidates.

# 2 – Leave Policy Does Not Cover All Employees Equally

In the U.S. there’s a huge trend of fathers caring for children including being the primary care provider and spending more quality time with their children than in decades past This number will only increase given the rise in adoption and other family building methods among LGBTQ community. Studies have shown that men regardless of sexual orientation who take family leave to care for their children can have negative impact on their careers. As a number of gay men add children to their family this can negative macho work culture can be a double hit of being discriminate against for being gay and then further for taking family leave to care for their child. We need to adapt our thought and appreciate the growing trend of fathers wanting to be more involved in raising their children. Unfortunately, many leave policies do not account for this trend – leaving same-sex partners at a loss when it comes to taking time off to care for their children.

Improvement Step: If you offer a family and/or medical leave policy at your company, make sure you are including same-sex partners, adopted children, and foster children in your definition of family members. Enhance your diversity training to embrace and even celebrate the kinder nurturing side of men backed by the studies.

#3 – Discrimination and Harassment Based on Sexual Orientation or Gender Identity

Discrimination and harassment happens in different ways. It can be verbal or written through direct statements, emails or jokes. It can be physical or the threat of physical violence. It can be unwanted sexual advances and/or threats related to sex. It can also be hidden within a decision – like not being considered for a promotion based on the decision maker’s learned prejudices and biases. Studies have found hiring and promoting LGBT employees to management is great for business.

In fact, some 21 percent of LGBT employees report being discriminated against with hiring, promotions, and pay, according to a survey conducted by UCLA’s Williams Institute and that further collaborated in a study by the University of Surrey. Studies show men get penalized for not holding to perceived masculine norms in the office regardless of sexual orientation.

Improvement Step: Consider having all hiring and promotion actions committee based to reduce the prejudices and biases of a single person impacting the company culture negatively. Develop a strong, all-inclusive anti-harassment policy that prevents employees and managers from discriminating against and/or harassing new hires and their co-workers.

If you hear any hate speech or see hurtful actions, or if reported something, make sure you take it seriously, investigate and take corrective action. Ensure your policies are communicated clearly and often.

#4 – Employees Don’t Report Acts of Discrimination or Harassment

Even though your company has a strong LGBTQ supportive anti-harassment policy in place, discrimination and harassment still happen. Some employees may still suffer in silence because they don’t feel comfortable speaking up and reporting it due to a feeling their job may be in jeopardy if they do. This causes the employee to feel unwelcomed in their place of work.

Improvement Steps: Be proactive through having the policies, education, and communicate it often and widely. Create an inclusive “speak-up” culture to so that your employees are comfortable standing up for themselves and report incidents affecting themselves or what they see or hear happening to a co-worker. Claim or add your company listing on OutBüro and invite your employees to rate your company.

The HRC Corporate Equality Index

The Corporate Equality Index (CEI) is an annual measure of how equitably large businesses in the United States treat their lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer employees, consumers, and investors. In 2018 they reported on 947 businesses. 609 Of those achieved a 100% score.

No matter your company size or location your company can be listed on OutBüro where you may indicate the LGBTQ supportive policies that are in place. Being present and active on OutBüro also supports gaining and maintaining a 100% score on the HRC Corporate Equality Index.

How to Demonstrate your LGBT-Inclusive Work Culture Regardless of Size or Location

In addition to the items noted above, making LGBTQ employees feel welcome in the workplace takes more than just one act. It needs to be ingrained in the culture.

For starters, however, here are a few things you can do to jump-start inclusion activities:

  1. Openly recruit LGBTQ candidates via LGBTQ focused job portals such as OutBüro.

  2. Start an LGBT Employee Resource Group.

  3. Offer LGBTQ-specific diversity training to your employees.

  4. Participate in local LGBTQ PRIDE events – gather employees who are interested in attending these events and go as a group!

  5. Reach out to LGBT professional associations to form a relationship to be visible for your current employees and cultivate new employee talent candidates.

  6. Donate to local LGBTQ non-profits to support your community.

  7. Contact an independent diversity and inclusion consultant who specializes in the LGBT community to assist as you assess your current environment and move to make improvements.
  8. Leverage that consultant or contact OutBüro to explore conducting an anonymous online survey of your employees before they start rating your company/organization publicly on OutBüro as an employer from their LGBT employee perspective

  9. Take your health care benefits a step further and offer a plan that covers and supports your transgender employees. Be sure to indicate this and all your LGBTQ supportive benefits and policies on OutBüro.

  10. Require all vendors and contractors you do business with to also have LGBTQ supportive policies.

  11. Be sure your employees are aware of all that you do by talking about it regularly.

  12. Get involved on OutBüro to attract quality candidates and ensure your current employees see your presence and activity. This further supports your HRC Corporate Equality Index rating if you now or plan to participate in that.

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LGBTQ Employees Still Face Legal Discrimination - OutBuro Employer Reviews Rating Gay Professional Network Lesbian Business Networking GLBT Company Queer Bisexual Transgender

LGBTQ Employees Still Face Legal Discrimination

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) people less likely to be hired, paid less, and not promoted. Political leaders change, and with that change, the federal, state and local government profess can be great or take steps backward. So it’s up to the corporate world to provide the protections and advances for their employees. When companies focus on Diversity and Inclusion it benefits the company, the shareholders and the employees.

Join Now - OutBuro LGBT Employer Reviews Rating Gay Professional Network Lesbian Business Networking Diversity Recruiting Jobs Company Queer Bisexual TransgenderAmerican everyday people attitudes have changed considerably in the last decade. The more comfortable LGBT people are coming out and being visible within the family, in their neighborhoods/communities and at work, the more others see them and get to know them. This removes the fear of “other” and “not like me”. I’ve had a saying for several years that is, “visibility leads to awareness and awareness leads to equality. In 2017, 63% of Americans said gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgenders, and queers should be accepted by society according to a Pew Research Center survey. In 2006 only a razor-thin 51% of Americans stated they agreed with that statement. This change in attitudes by every day Americans may be the reason for the changes in corporate diversity and inclusion work culture. As of now, right about 89% of Fortune 500 companies have implemented company LGBTQ friendly and supportive policies prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation studies conducted by the Human Rights Campaign. However, even with these changing beliefs and attitudes, the local, state, federal laws have not yet caught up with the changing tide.

There is currently no nation-wide law to protect gender and sexual minorities from employment discrimination in the private sector or under most states employment laws. In the majority of the US states, being fired due to sexual orientation or gender orientation is a huge risk and reality. In Arkansas, the state government went as far as passing a law to prevent local governments from passing separate laws to prohibit employment discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender orientation.

Twenty-eight states have laws prohibiting employment discrimination based on sexual orientation for public employees according to Lambda Legal. Some argue that providing protections for LGBTQ people in at work violates the religious freedom of the business owner or other employees. Some companies/organizations prohibit discrimination against LGBTQ workers if they work for the state but have no law extending to private sector employers.

In a past article titled “LGBT Workers in over half of the United States lack full protection”, we compared the legal protection each state offers against discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender orientation. Check out this article for a graphic of the United States coverage of LGBT state-level protections.

What Can Companies Do to Improve Work Culture for LGBT Employees?

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OutBuro - Research Finds Females Favor Hiring Gay and Lesbian Job Seekers - LGBT Professional Networking employee Employer Company Reviews Directory GLBT Bisexual Transgender Community Portal Board

Research Finds Females Favor Hiring Gay and Lesbian Job Seekers

Women are somewhat more inclined to hire gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer job candidates when compared to equally-qualified heterosexual applicants, according to a study headed by the University of Sussex. However, the contrary is true when the recruiter is a male. All else being equal, male recruiters and hiring managers judge perceived heterosexual applicants as more desirable to hire.

One would assume that a recruiter and hiring manager with more experience would not demonstrate prejudice bias. Surprisingly, this prejudice was stronger among people who had considerable experience of assessing resumes/ CVs.

Female recruiters scored homosexual candidates an average of 5.21 and heterosexual candidates 4.8.  Whereas males scored homosexual candidates 4.6 and heterosexual candidates 4.93.

The analysis in the Journal of Business and Psychology is the first to spot a favorable bias for gay and lesbian applicants in the hiring process. This manifests when only females are making the hiring decisions and are the make up the majority of the hiring process from initial resume scanning, through interviews and offers of employment. Since an all-female hiring panel is not common the LGBT job seeker remains at a huge disadvantage based on learned bias. Hiring panels made by groups of both women and men could result in less biased conclusions.

Dr. Ben Everly of Sussex’s School of Business, Management, and Economics, “These results reveal that prejudice against gay men and lesbians is considerably more nuanced than previous work indicates.”

Also, these outcomes can impact if and how gay men and lesbians reveal their homosexual identities on the job.  This can make many feel the need to be in the closet at work.

Across two experiments, around 400 people were randomly shown one of four resumes/CVs: that of a lesbian, a gay male, a straight female or a straight male. The resumes presented where identical in all details, such as professional expertise. The only differences were if it indicated a male or female indicated through the name – Greg Johnson (man) or Jennifer Lewis (female) and secondly for each gender it listed belonging to a professional association. Those were the Los Angeles Gay Business Professionals (LGBT applicants) or Los Angeles Business Professionals (straight applicants). Note there was only one-word difference in those organizations – Gay. During post-experiment screening, some participants that wrongly identified that a candidate’s sexual orientation had been taken out of the research.

The analysis also found signs that women perceived the gay and lesbians applicants to be warm and competent, which these factors affected their hiring choices.

Males, however, considered heterosexual candidates as more capable, which influenced their hiring choices, but revealed no difference in perceived warmth between the four candidates.

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Source: Journal of Business and Psychology

The Journal of Business and Psychology (JBP) is an international outlet for publishing high-quality research designed to advance organizational science and practice. Since its inception in 1986, the journal has published impactful scholarship in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Organizational Behavior, Human Resources Management, Work Psychology, Occupational Psychology, and Vocational Psychology.

http://www.springer.com/psychology/personality+%26+social+psychology/journal/10869OutBuro - LGBT Employer Company Reviews Ratings Directory GBLT Professionals Networking Gay Owned Lesbian Transgender Bisexual Community Job Portal Board Postings Entrepreneurs Career Seeker Workplace Culture

OutBuro - Study finds LGBT people less likely to be hired paid less and not promoted - LGBT Employer Company Reviews Directory GLBT Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Networking Community Job Portal Board

Study finds LGBT people less likely to be hired, paid less, and not promoted

A study recently published in the “Archives of Sexual Behaviour” conducted researchers at the University Surrey in the UK introduced voice samples and images with backgrounds removed of homosexual (gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer) alongside the heterosexual persons, to a panel of heterosexual men and women. Participants weren’t informed of the subjects sexual orientation but permitted to openly guess their sexual orientation purely on the voice and photo of their face. The premise of the study was the heterosexual participants were recruiters and hiring managers and was instructed to evaluate the employability of the candidates. The participants were asked to respond to 5 statements on a scale of 1-5 as well as to provide their view of the perceived monthly wages they believed would be fair for the candidate.

They found that when participants perceived subjects to be homosexual (LGBT) – real or not, the believed them to be inadequate as leaders.

For male study candidates, voice and speech rather than physical looks influenced heavily on if they have been deemed appropriate for the job. Researchers discovered that projecting a “heterosexual-sounding” instead of the “gay-sounding” voice generated the belief that the study candidate normally displays masculine traits, which subsequently improved their perceived suitability for the job and the justification for a higher wage and advancement. The study discovered that heterosexuals believed gay men ought to be paid less than their heterosexual counterparts.

Perceived lesbian applicants were correlated with a deficiency of femininity and deemed as gender non-conforming. They received significantly less favorable evaluation compared to heterosexual perceived counterparts.

Dr. Fabio Fasoli explained: “These results reveal that the mere sound of a voice is enough to trigger stereotyping denying gay-sounding along with lesbian-sounding speakers that the benefit which is deemed typical of the gender.”

This study is demonstrating that despite all of the work to reduce workplace discrimination against the perceived and real LGBT workers and professionals, heterosexual individuals subconsciously typecast a person before getting to know them and make decisions to discriminate against them. This study highlights the real struggles at work and their career prospects. Heterosexuals can say that they pay their staff based on their qualifications, however, the basis of the employee/s value is being directly influenced by learned prejudices and stereotypes perpetuating inequality and oppression.

In another study participants were requested to listen to only the voices of two distinct speakers of one neutral content sentence and then asked to assess the speakers’ probable character traits and individual interests (i.e. sports, arts, areas of study and career). The traits and interests were manipulated in order to uncover stereotyping regarded as “generally manly” (e.g., soccer) and “typically feminine” (e.g., dancing). Additionally, participants were asked which of those speakers they’d select as a friend. The study was done in two parts. The first studying males and the second females.

Researchers found that participants attributed womanly traits into the perceived gay males compared to perceived heterosexual male speakers. Perceived lesbian speakers were far much more likely to be associated with manly traits than with feminine traits.

When asked which of these speakers’ participants would select as an acquaintance/friend, researchers discovered that male participants were far more likely to steer clear of gay-sounding speakers. This indicates the subtle yet real effect of how purely the voice and speech patterns contributes to social exclusion of homosexual people both in the workplace and in general society.

Dr. Fasoli added: “This study demonstrates that unacceptable levels of discrimination, be they subconscious or conscious, still exists in our society, and we need to do more to tackle the discrimination faced by the LGBT community.”

More information: Fabio Fasoli et al, Gay- and Lesbian-Sounding Auditory Cues Elicit Stereotyping and Discrimination, Archives of Sexual Behavior (2017). DOI: 10.1007/s10508-017-0962-0

Journal reference: Archives of Sexual Behavior – Springer Science+Business Media –
http://www.springer.com/public+health/journal/10508

University of Surrey – http://www.surrey.ac.uk/

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OutBuro - LGBT Workplace Equality – 5 Examples to Help Allies Understand - LGBT Employer Company Reviews Directory GLBT Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Queer Professional Community Job Portal Board

LGBT Workplace Equality – 5 Examples to Help Allies Understand

Ally companies put LGBT-friendly policies and business practices into place. But they don’t stop there knowing that policies are not enough. They create a workplace culture of inclusiveness and celebrate the differences that make each employee great. They actively recruit LGBTQ employees and welcome constructive feedback on how they are doing can how they can improve.

Employment discrimination and LGBT workplace equality have always been something of a personal issue and now my it is my focus with OutBüro – The LGBTQ Employer Reviews, Job Portal & Professional and Entrepreneur Community and it’s LinkedIn group, the largest LGBT professional networking group on LinkedIn.

My Personal Story

Dennis Velco - OutBüro - The LGBTQ Employer Reviews, Job Portal & Professional and Entrepreneur Community Job Portal Board Resume CV Database Diversity and Inclusing Recruiting CareerProfessionally, I’d say that I’ve always been conservatively out. I have never made my sexuality a huge deal wearing it on my sleeve, but I have never tried to overtly hide it either – besides my time in the US Army in the late 80’s. When I’d start new jobs or client projects I’d be invited to the social after work functions. Then as my sexuality became apparent those invites were reduced to only the super gay-friendly staff who wanted to do all the gay-things in the city. So the limited inclusiveness was layered with stereotypes of going to gay dance clubs and helping them shop for home décor, clothes, and gifts. Sure I’ve got style but at the time didn’t realize how I was being excluded and superficially used.

In my work and projects, I felt like I always had to go above and beyond the norm to prove myself to my employers and clients. I even had to deal with sexual harassment from a female senior executive that knew I was gay but seemed to feel that was a challenge she wanted to concur. Right now what are you thinking? Check yourself. Are you thinking, “poor him a woman was hitting on him”? If so, that’s a problem.

It became so bad I loathed going to the office, my days were filled with trying to avoid her and her excuses to be at my desk where she’d lean over from behind to point at my computer screen so that she could rub her breast against my back. This was coupled with many other innuendos and overt comments several times a week on how she liked how my pants fit and which ones didn’t hug my butt or crotch. I had no way to voice my frustration, anxiety, and anger too. No one took me seriously. When I tried to raise my concerns and issues I was literally laughed at by the Human Resource manager. He told me to toughen up and that he wished that executive was interested in him. REALLY With the rude and crude gay jokes from many male team members and the overt sexual harassment from the female top executive, my work-life was stressful and ultimately had to leave that employer. I felt I had no recourse. It was a nightmare.

This caused me to enter corporate consulting where my Fortune 1000 and government clients changed every few months. I put myself in a position of swooping in, doing my job and leaving so that I was nowhere long enough to have it matter. If it was bad, as it was several more time, I knew I had an exit and on to the next project. After a couple years of living out of a suitcase and hotel rooms, I again began to hate my work-life and my life in general with no roots and no real connections. It was difficult to make and maintain friendships and relationships traveling 75-90% of my work-life for 12 years. It was isolating.

Corporate LGBT-Friendly Policies

Today, corporations are leading the charge of LGBT rights and protections for employees. Companies of all sizes are implementing LGBT-friendly policies that include:

• Sexual orientation non-discrimination policy
• Gender identity non-discrimination policy
• Domestic partner benefits
• Transgender-inclusive benefits
• LGBTQ inclusive education

I share the above story of being sexually harassed to point out that in the United States Sexual Harassment policies have been in place since the mid-70’s. Yet it still happens today. Not only to women but also to men like me with both female and male perpetrators. My own incident may have happened quite some time ago, but just turn on any news station of your choice and within a week’s time you are sure to see a high profile case in the news today – right now. This clearly demonstrates that having company policies alone are not enough to remove and eliminate the root problem, change minds or culture.

Why Will LGBT-Discrimination Remain an Issue

I’d like to concentrate on the larger picture and examine why irrespective of anti-discrimination policies and legislative changes, LGBTQ employment discrimination will stay economically divisive, socially permissible and sadly common. Naturally gaining heterosexual allies to recognize this issue as a legitimate and continuing struggle for everyone regardless of sexual orientation is paramount to lasting equality for all. It all boils down to getting to know others and trying to empathize with their perspective. We have to keep in mind it isn’t LGBTQ people that are responsible for homophobia, thus ponder the sociological ecosystem of implicit homophobia that still does not permit queer people to thrive within it.

During my business travels working in hundreds of companies and government agencies I and found that my queer colleagues have nearly uniformly been and are more dedicated to performance and excellence in comparison to our heterosexual counterparts. This is not new or news. It’s fairly common knowledge. Why? It seems that in addition to overcoming any economic hurdles, their particular internalized homophobic programming and assorted trauma connected with a multitude of other societal disadvantages, disapproval, and rejection, they continue to be cautious and quite concerned about how others view about them to a much higher degree than their heterosexual peers. They are addressing a reality that their best will not be good enough, it will be discounted, simply because of who they are. Having experienced this in myself and observing so many others, I believe this bears “real-world” workplace significance.

Undermining Statements From Human Resources and Management

In an uninformed and apathetic manner, I’ve had the below statements made to me numerous times along my career journey. We need to re-frame the understanding of how gay, lesbian, bisexual transgender and queers struggle (not an exhaustive list):

1) Are you sure it was discrimination?
In other words: “Aren’t you just playing the gay card because it’s easier than nursing a bruised ego?” This is an invalidation that stems from a lack of desire to listen, learn and expend some true effort to assess the actual situation. Playing ones part within a discriminating culture means you don’t have to actively discriminate, however, you can certainly assist by remaining quite yourself and further silencing and demoralizing those who object to oppression. With this action, you also don’t have to stop and evaluate the experiences of other people in systems that you might incidentally thrive in, and therefore have no personal objections to. Allies do not show up for the party and then try to argue that the battle is not constant and affects everyone in the workplace. Thoughtfully listen to the full story, even if it shatters your own insecurities and past learned beliefs. Don’t enforce your narrative into it and emphasize your vantage point as the universal default. Become self-aware of when you are doing so and realize that it is not helpful and in fact perpetuates discrimination or worse.

2) Discrimination will be a hard thing to prove.
If an organization discriminates against a person, it’s the organization that must establish in court that it did not discriminate. Why is it so easily deemed that there ought to be a different set of rules for LGBTQ people, implying that it is up to them to prove that they are not lying, omitting facts or being oversensitive? Queer folks are actually all exceptional individuals. This thinking negates the fact that the injustice is being carried out by the perpetrator and not the victim. It dismisses the possibility that not all queer folks can financially afford to challenge discrimination in a court of law. Allies could educate themselves on systems of oppression and verses supporting dismissive statements.

3) But women – or insert race/gender/religion/nationality here – are discriminated against too.
If we are attempting to change a culture of discrimination specifically against queer people of all genders, races, nationalities, and heritage, it’s very diminishing to try and argue that there are simply more important problems, and by assuming gender/race/religious/nationality equality is explicitly heterosexual. Queer equality crosses all other equality categories. Listening is a really important part of supporting. We might use listening to build a sense of common purpose, silently recognizing similarities and then sharing approaches instead of falling into the trap of compartmentalized divisive thinking. Listen, get to know and understand your fellow human and co-worker.

4) Women are discriminated against all of the time. You are a man, so toughen up.
This type of statement is indeed binary, and once again fails to comprehend both why and how gay men and women are discriminated against so broadly and effectively. When you are a guy with perceived feminine qualities or a woman with perceived masculine traits, then gender stereotype fetishization and glorification of male masculinity and female femininity is used to discount, ridicule and isolate individuals and groups. Often a “hetero-passable” receive a pass or partial acceptance because they “fit” the environment cultural norm. This causes the employee to feel devalued again feeding into the idea that they have to work harder to prove themselves to be worthy.

5) You seem very angry. You may not wish to alienate or anger straight people.
I never want to purposely anger anyone, per se. However, I do want to upset the damaging hierarchies and power systems that all of us so effortlessly accept and preserve without any people ever receiving any real advantage from them. Frustration can lead to anger. But put yourself in that person’s perspective. Would you be frustrated and/or angry if the situation was directed at you? Oppressed people are generally exhausted from persevering it for the time until they’ve reached their tipping point to bring it to your attention. It is likely not an isolated event that has pushed them to the point of finally reaching out for help. Listen, analysis, empathize and rationally decide actions to take to address the current situation and prevent it from happening to others in the future.

Summary

Allies must acknowledge personal accountability, empathize with another person’s situation and then attempt to modify their thoughts and actions to grow from new knowledge and personal connections. Allies question their past learned beliefs and accept that their own thoughts and ideas about others may need to change. They take a proactive approach to empower and affect change within themselves, within coworkers and within the companies and organizations they work in and participate in.

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