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Understanding Gender Identity and Expression 101

Understanding gender identity and expression to support education in LGBTQ corporate equality for a welcoming workplace.

Most people when they hear – LGBTQ – they think of it is a group of individuals who are attracted to members of the same sex to some degree. Interestingly, most don’t realize that the “T” does not directly relate to a person’s sexual attraction at all. It is separate and refers to a person’s sense of gender. Inside, do they feel like a male or female or even somewhere in between the two. This is referred to as gender identity.

Before the 19th century, the terms gender and sex were interchangeable. It was believed was what you physically appeared as at birth was cut and dry. Binary. Female or male from birth in body, mind, and soul.

Around 1925, a sexologist named Magnus Hirschfeld from Germany published an article. In it, he described for the first time the difference between the sexual desire for persons of the same gender compared to a deep desire to live and/or dress as the opposite gender because it matches how you feel and view yourself.

In the 1950s the concepts and theories about gender, gender roles, and gender identity were introduced and defined in the psychological literature. Psychologists, such as Jerome Kagan and John Money, initially believed that gender identity was simply a degree a person felt feminine or masculine coupled with the ability to live openly and freely as who they are supporting a secure sense of self.

From around 1965 through 1985 researchers such as Sandra Bem, Richard Green, Harry Benjamin, and, Robert Stoller furthered the understanding of gender and gender identity. Green, Benjamin, and Stoller pioneered gender identity clinics, as well as gender-related medical and surgical treatments.

The ongoing work of these and other pioneer researchers in the field of gender identity development raised awareness that gender is not exclusively determined by assigned sex at birth but determined by a person’s sense, belief, and the ultimate expression of self.

A bit more to understand

The term transgender is an overall term for people whose gender identity, expression and/or behavior is different from those typically associated with their assigned sex at birth. Since the 1990s, transgender has also been used to describe:

  • transsexuals
  • crossdressers
  • androgynous people
  • genderqueers
  • gender non-conforming people

Transgender men had or have female body parts; however, they may identify and/or express themselves as male. Female to male or F2M.

Transgender women had or have male body parts; however, they may identify and/or express themselves as female. Male to female or M2F.

Research shows that gender identity, in many cases, is independent of sexual orientation.

  • Androphilic are people that were born with a male body, have a female gender identity, and are attracted to men. My understanding is like this:
    • M2F Straight
    • F2M Straight.
  • Gynephilia is people that were born with a male body, have a female gender and are attracted to women. My understanding is like this:
    • M2F Lesbian
    • F2M Gay
  • Cis-Gender, is a person who feels that how they mentally identify matches their physical body.
    • Cis-male
    • Cis-female

See: List of LGBTQ+ terms with definitions

Marketors, employers, prevention specialists, and healthcare providers should be aware that beliefs impact almost all areas of a person’s life, their feeling of accepted and being welcomed.

Think about not only your own beliefs and attitudes but how can you impact your place of business, your working environment, policies, benefits. How can you make your company, business, institution more accessible and in some cases safe?

If in my attempts to simplify for the sake of understanding a very complex field I’m happy to be constructively corrected and happy to edit the content if necessary. Please add your comments below.

I’ve already written about the Surrey University study demonstrating a clear bias against persons who are perceived as LGBT in the hiring process, promotions, and salary. Added to the stress of work anyone faces, adds being verbally harassed or worse not just at work but everywhere.

At this point, it’s – Duh!. In order to understand you have to get to know.

If you work for a company if not already happening, suggest or start social gatherings to get to know others out of the work environment. Maybe host a company talent show or other activities that foster interaction embracing the differences. The biggest is connect with others and be open and willing to give everyone an opportunity to shine. Listen carefully. Do you have interests in common? Do you hear an opportunity to partner on a project to help each other and maybe others in the company or community?

OutBüro’s Gender Identity and Expression Model

The concept of gender identity and expression graphic to help explain the concepts is not new. Hower, OutBüro decided to create our own with some modifications to past models to help further clarify the concepts.

Most models to date have a scale with feminine on one end of a spectrum and masculine on the opposite. We believe that having them separately represented is more accurate was of thinking and helps to better understand.

Meet Chris – the OutBüro Gender Identity and Expression Model

In the diagram below consider the lines noting masculine and feminine as each independent sliding scales from 0 to 100%.

Gender Idendity Attraction Sex Express Model - OutBuro - LGBTQ Corporate Equality Employer Branding Reviews Ratings Gay Lesbian Transgender

Gender Identity

Gender Identity is how you, in your head, experience and define your gender, based on how much you align (or don’t align) with what you understand the options for gender to be. Common associations: personality traits, jobs, hobbies, likes, dislikes, roles, expectations

Gender Expression

Gender Expression is how you present gender (through your actions, clothing, and demeanor, to name a few), and how those presentations are viewed based on social expectations. Common associations: style, grooming, clothing, mannerisms, affect, appearance, hair, make-up

Anatomical Sex

Anatomical Sex is the physical traits you’re born with or develop that we think of as “sex characteristics,” as well as the sex you are assigned at birth. Common associations: body hair, chest, hips, shoulders, hormones penis, vulva, chromosomes, voice pitch

Attraction

Attraction is how you find yourself feeling drawn (or not drawn) to some other people, in sexual, romantic, and/or other ways (often categorized within gender).

Same-Sex Partners 73 percent Discriminated Against by Mortgage Lenders - LGBT Study Iowa State University - OutBuro - Gay Lesbian Business News Professional Netowrk Information

Same-Sex Partners 73% Discriminated Against by Mortgage Lenders

Purchasing a home is a significant life event for most. The process is both exciting and stressful To add to that stress a new study suggests home mortgage lenders are less likely to approve gay and lesbian same-sex couples.

Same-sex borrowers may perform better – Gao

The study, by researchers at Iowa State University’s Ive’s
Ivy College of Business, focused on national mortgage data from 1990 to 2015 and found the approval rate for same-sex couples was 3 to 8 percent lower. The research also included more detail dive about applicants’ work history and creditworthiness analyzed from a smaller dataset. Based on this data, same-sex applicants were 73 percent more likely to be denied than heterosexual couples.

Hua Sun portrait

Hua Sun

Gay and lesbian same-gender couples who were approved paid higher interest and fees. Co-authors Hua Sun (pictured right) and Lei Gao (pictured in featured image), associate and assistant professors of finance, respectively, say the difference in finance fees averaged less than .5 %, but combined added up as much as $86 million annually.

Another research study published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found no evidence that gay and lesbian couples had a higher risk of mortgage default.

“Lenders can justify higher fees, if there is greater risk,” Gao said. “We found nothing to indicate that’s the case. In fact, our findings weakly suggest same-sex borrowers may perform better.”

Protection needed

While mortgage applicants are not required to disclose their sexual orientation, however when two women or two men walk in for a home loan through information causally shared while the couple is just being themselves can lead to discrimination. As indicated in another study by the University of Surrey, indicating that during an employment hiring process, LGBT people are discriminated against based solely on their appearance and/or speech. The Surrey study found that person who may or may not be LGBT but are preceived as being so are less likely to be hired, promoted and paid less than their heterosexual counterparts. This perception is just as damaging in terms of discrimination in the mortgage lending process the researchers say.

Check out this related study by Prudential on the financial health of American by gender, race and sexual orientation.

Sun and Gao say the findings of their Mortgage Lending study illustrate a need for change to make the lending laws fair for everyone. Loan decisions should be not be based on, not skin color, sexual orientation or gender. Lending should be based only on fundamental economic factors. Sun says making sexual orientation a protected class would limit potential discrimination.

The Fair Housing and Equal Credit Opportunity acts prohibit discrimination based on a borrower’s race, gender, marital status or religion, however, neither specifically, list sexual orientation.S

“Policymakers need to guarantee same-sex couples have equal access to credit,” Sun said. “Using our framework, credit monitoring agencies also can take steps to investigate unfair lending practices.”

Mortgage lenders though can move ahead of government and as a business ensure their company polices include being open, welcoming and fair to the LGBT community in their lending practices.

Sun and Gao used data from the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and Fannie Mae Loan Performance to test whether perceived sexual orientation affected mortgage approval, cost and performance. Utilizing these datasets allowed researchers to validate their findings and control for factors such as income, variations in lenders’ underwriting standards and property type, which may influence approval rates.

Co-applicants with the same gender were identified as same-sex couples for the study. The researchers used Gallup and Census Bureau data of geographic distributions of LGBT adults to verify their identification strategy and reported a good matching quality.

Location, location, location

Previous research has shown that recent home purchases or refinancing in a neighborhood can predict defaults, which influences mortgage lending approval and interest rates. To determine if the percentage of LGBT individuals living in a neighborhood contributed to the disparity in approval rates, Sun and Gao looked at county-level percentages of same-sex applicants each year.

What they found was somewhat surprising. In neighborhoods with more same-sex couples, both same-sex and different-sex borrowers seem to experience more unfavorable lending outcomes overall. The researchers say the findings should raise enough concern to warrant further investigation.

Prudential study explores financial lives of Americans by race gender sexual identity caregiver status - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Prudential study explores financial lives of Americans by race, gender, sexual identity, caregiver status

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Rate Prudential Financial as an LGBTQ employee

Bright spots and areas of optimism exist within traditionally underserved groups in the face of income inequality, retirement insecurity and household debt, new data from Prudential Financial reveals. The in-depth exploration of data from Prudential’s Financial Wellness Census™ highlights the dramatic differences in the experiences of diverse populations within the U.S., many of whom were disproportionately impacted by the 2008 financial crisis.

The report, “The Cut – Exploring Financial Wellness Within Diverse Populations,” is based on a survey of more than 3,000 U.S. adults and examines the financial lives of a diverse group of Americans: women, black Americans, Latino Americans, Asian Americans, caregivers, and the LGBTQ community.

“Resilient and diverse communities are the foundation of a stable and strong economy. Their progress enables our progress,” said Judy Dougherty, Prudential’s financial wellness officer. “This new analysis presents a layered portrait of the financial lives of Americans and exposes factors that underlie and sometimes impede our ability to achieve financial security. These insights are critically important to Prudential’s businesses, informing our efforts to develop products and services that help more Americans improve their financial health.”

The data highlights challenges and opportunities

The research details the wide range of outcomes, experiences and attitudes among traditionally underserved communities. For example:

  • By significant margins, black Americans at all income levels are more likely than the general population to prioritize helping others financially: taking care of parents or other family members, providing college tuition for their children, helping children with a down payment on a home, leaving an inheritance to their heirs, and giving to charity.
  • The average annual income for women in the survey was $52,521, compared with $84,006 for men—women reported earning about 63 cents for every dollar earned by men. Additionally, 54 percent of all women reported being the primary breadwinner in their household, irrespective of its makeup.
  • Thirty-eight percent of caregivers in the study do not think they will ever be able to retire versus only 25 percent of non-caregivers. Although caregivers for children with special needs were as likely as other caregivers and non-caregivers to have a defined contribution retirement plan, they were also the most likely to have taken a loan or hardship withdrawal.

“The journey to financial wellness is deeply personal,” said Lata Reddy, Prudential’s senior vice president, Diversity, Inclusion & Impact. “While there are common experiences that tie us all together, there are also distinct factors that are unique to our individual journeys that impact the ultimate destination. These factors need to be clearly understood for true progress to be made. The first step is to actively listen to the voices in our communities, and it is in this spirit that this research was conducted.”

For more information, view the full report, “The Cut – Exploring Financial Wellness Within Diverse Populations.” Prudential has also created a three-minute self-assessment to enable individuals to discover where they stand on their own personal path to financial wellness. To take the financial wellness assessment and to explore a visualization of its data, visit prudential.com/stateofus.

Prudential Financial Wellness Census methodology

The original Financial Wellness CensusTM was conducted by Prudential’s Decision Insights Group and Chadwick Martin Bailey within the United States between Sept. 20 and Oct. 9, 2017, among a nationally representative sample of 3,013 U.S. adults ages 25-70. For the complete survey methodology, including weighting variables and subgroup sample sizes, please contact [email protected].

About Prudential Financial, Inc.

Contacts

MEDIA CONTACT:
Prudential Financial, Inc.
Yemi Rose
973-802-7641
[email protected]

Sharp Communications
Beverly Basiga
212-829-0002 ext.113
[email protected]

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LGBTQ Discrimination Limits Access to Health Care - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

LGBTQ Discrimination Limits Access to Health Care

Center for American Progress - OutBuro Gay Professional Networking LGBT Business News Employer Reviews Information Queer Community Lesbian Entrepreneuer GLBT Job Board PostingsA survey study conducted by the Center for American Progress in 2017 verified and revealed that LGBTQ people experience discrimination when seeking health care services.  Also, if they are turned away from service due to discrimination, harassment, and mistreatment LGBTQ people may have trouble finding alternative avenues for health services.  Those experiences discourage them from seeking needed care.  This data demonstrates the importance of protecting LGBTQ people from discrimination in health care.

When needing to see a doctor, whether for routine care or emergency services no one should have to consider if they will be refused service, or be subject to discrimination, harassment or be mistreated under any circumstance.  In the United States, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) addressed this concern by prohibiting insurance providers and health care facilities and professionals from discriminating.  Under the Obama administration, LGBTQ people were explicitly protected against discrimination in health care on the basis of gender identity and sexual orientation.  Since the current administration continues to attempt to dismantle the ACA leaving many to wonder how they’ll cover health costs in addition to how their now discrimination protection may be affected.

Health care discrimination endangers the lives of LGBTQ people

This endangerment happens through delays or denials of medically necessary care based on the learned prejudices and biases of the medical professional staff.

  • While at a hospital, a patient with HIV disclosed that he was gay and therefore has sex with other men.  Those who were supposed to be there to provide care refused to provide his HIV medication.
  • A transgender teenager who struggled with thoughts of suicide and followed through attempts of self-harm was subject to being repeatedly called by both genders by medical team members and discharged sooner than normal standards for no apparent reason.   Not long after the teen committed suicide.
  • An infant was turned away from a pediatrician’s office because she had same-sex parents. Half the US states, such as Michigan, lack statewide laws against LGBTQ discrimination.  However, Section 1557 of the ACA provides federal protections for LGBTQ people overriding state laws.

LGBTQ discrimination and mistreatment primary care doctor offices

Despite protections now in place, for the time being, LGBTQ people still face an alarming rate of health care discrimination, harassment, humiliation, to outright being turned away by hospitals, pharmacists, and doctors. The Center for American Progress study data outlines the types of discrimination that many LGBTQ people endure when seeking medical care.

Data below is from those gay, lesbian, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) who responded and had visited a doctor or health care provider in the year just prior to the survey:

  • 8% indicated that a doctor or other health care provider refused to see them because of their actual or perceived sexual orientation.
  • 6% responded that a doctor or other health care provider refused to give them health care related to their actual or perceived sexual orientation.
  • 7% replied that a doctor or other health care provider refused to recognize their family, including a child or a same-sex spouse or partner.
  • 9% said that a doctor or other health care provider used harsh or abusive language when treating them.
  • 7% indicated that they experienced unwanted physical contact from a doctor or other health care provider (such as fondling, sexual assault, or rape).

Among transgender people who had visited a doctor or health care providers’ office in the past year:

  • 29% said a doctor or other health care provider refused to see them because of their actual or perceived gender identity.
  • 12% responded a doctor or other health care provider refused to give them health care related to gender transition.
  • 23% indicated doctor or other health care provider intentionally misgendered them or used the wrong name.
  • 21% replied a doctor or other health care provider used harsh or abusive language when treating them.
  • 29% indicated that they experienced unwanted physical contact from a doctor or other health care provider (such as fondling, sexual assault, or rape).

Discrimination discourages LGBTQ people from seeking health care

Discrimination, even the perceived potential for discrimination, can create anxiety and trepidation in LGBTQ people making seeking care when they need it difficult and scary.  The Center for American Progress survey data validated that past actual and the perceived potential of discrimination played a factor in discouraging or preventing a large number of LGBTQ people from seeking health care.

  • 8% of all LGBTQ people reported avoided or postponed needed medical care because of the perceived potential of being disrespected or discriminated against from health care staff.
  • Further for those who have experienced direct negative experiences in their past, the number jumped to 14%.
  • Among transgender people, 22% reported such avoidance.
  • When it came to preventative screenings such as for HIV or cholesterol, 7% of LGBTQ respondents reported avoiding or postponing care in the year prior to the survey, while 17 percent of LGBTQ respondents who had experienced discrimination that year and 19% of transgender people reporting avoidance during that period.

An earlier CAP analysis reported other findings from this survey that also indicated the effect of discrimination on LGBTQ people’s willingness to seek out health care. In that analysis, 6.7 percent of LGBTQ people reported that they avoided doctor’s offices in the past year out of fear of discrimination. This avoidance behavior is even more common among LGBTQ people who reported having experienced discrimination in the past year: 18.4 percent reported avoiding doctor’s offices to avoid discrimination, nearly seven times the rate of LGBTQ people who had not experienced discrimination in the past year, at 2.7 percent.

These Center for American Progress findings are consistent with other research. The 2015 U.S. Transgender Survey found that nearly 1 in 4 transgender people (23 percent) had avoided seeking needed health care in the past year due to fear of discrimination or mistreatment.

Finding another doctor is not an answer for all LGBTQ patients

The expansion of legislation, lawsuits, and administrative rule-making allowing for broad learned religious beliefs exemptions from providing services puts another hurdle in the way of LGBTQ people receiving medical care. For those patients that do seek medical care and are turned away by providers, alternatives may not be easily accessible depending on where they live and their travel abilities.  This concern is exacerbated by a shortage of medical providers in key areas of treatment such as mental health care and specialty services.  Not all LGBTQ people live in metro areas and the shortage of LGBTQ friendly medical providers in rural areas is common.

The Center for American Progress survey data illustrate that many LGBTQ people would face significant difficulty neding to locate an alternative provider if they were turned away by a health care provider, such as a pharmacy, hospital, community clinic or primary care provider.

  • 18% of LGBTQ people indicated it would be “very difficult” or “not possible” to find the same type of service at a different hospital.
  • 17% of LGBTQ people responded that it would be “very difficult” or “not possible” to find the same type of service at a different community health center or clinic.
  • 8% of LGBTQ people said it would be “very difficult” or “not possible” to find the same type of service at a different pharmacy.

LGBTQ people living outside of a metropolitan area report a high rate of difficulty accessing alternative services, which may be because such services could be further away and lack transportation or related costs is a hinderance.

  • 41% of nonmetro LGBTQ people responded stating it would be “very difficult” or “not possible” to find the same type of service at a different hospital.
  • 31% of nonmetro LGBTQ people indicated it would be “very difficult” or “not possible” to find the same type of service at a different community health center or clinic.
  • 17% of nonmetro LGBTQ people said it would be “very difficult” or “not possible” to find the same type of service at a different pharmacy.

Transgender people also report difficulty accessing alternatives at a high rate:

  • 31% of transgender people said it would be “very difficult” or “not possible” to find the same type of service at a different hospital.
  • 30% of transgender people responded stating it would be “very difficult” or “not possible” to find the same type of service at a different community health center or clinic.
  • 16% of transgender people indicated it would be “very difficult” or “not possible” to find the same type of service at a different pharmacy.

Where available, some LGBTQ go to a LGBT focused community health center to avoid such discrimination and many do not provide comprehensive services.  For the states that have them, such LGBT comunity health centers are normally located in large metropolian areas.  A total of 13 states—mainly those in the central United States—do not have any LGBTQ community health centers at all. On the U.S. Transgender Survey, 29 percent of respondents seeking transition-related care reported having to travel 25 miles or more to access such care.

Conclusion

Despite the importance of protecting people from discrimination in health care settings, current regulations are under attack by the current White House administration, state governments and organization based on their learned reliougous beliefs. On August 23, 2016, a group of conservative religious organizations and eight states filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), challenging the 1557 rule. They made dubious claims that the nondiscrimination protections would require doctors to provide treatment that violated their learned religious beliefs while they see and treat othe patients who don’t adhere to all the laws of their religious docturine such as adulturers and persons who where clothing of mixed fibers.

Even though numerous courts have ruled that laws such as 1557 protect LGBTQ people, in December 2016, a single federal judge issued a nationwide injunction prohibiting HHS from enforcing the 1557 rule’s prohibition on discrimination on the basis of gender identity. On May 2, 2017, the Trump-Pence administration filed a motion indicating that the 1557 rule was under review, and in August, it announced that HHS had already written a draft proposal to roll back the rule. Given the Trump-Pence administration’s record on LGBTQ issues, new regulations will likely deny the existence of protections to LGBTQ people and make equal health care access and treatment more difficult to obtain for this historically marginalized community. While the administration cannot change the protections for LGBTQ people that exist under the law, a regulatory rollback would cause fear and confusion for patients and promote discrimination by providers and insurers.

 


Are you aware of additional studies on LGBTQ healtcare that we can bring to our audience?  Contact us with a link for consideration.  Much appreciated.

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Survey - Not a Single Philippine Company is LGBTQ Inclusive - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Survey – Not a Single Philippine Company is LGBTQ Inclusive

Philippine LGBT Chamber of Commerce - OutBuro - Gay Professional Networking LGBT Business News GLBT Entrepreneur Community Lesbian Owner Queer JobsThere are zero LGBTQ diversity and inclusive supportive Philippine companies as found by a recent survey study according to a study conducted by the Philippine LGBT Chamber of Commerce with the support of the research firm Cogneica and the Netherlands.  What they did find is that the only companies in the Philippines to offer gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer employees any level of inclusive policies and benefits are all foreign-owned businesses.  Of these small number of companies, everyone is a business process outsourcer leaving the opportunity for Philippine employees a diverse range of employment while feeling safe and welcomed at work is dismal.  To start A recent study found that internationally even being perceived as LGBTQ can impact your ability to get hired, get promoted and even if hired the salary the employer decides you are worth is typically far reduced than what they pay a perceived heterosexual.  Another recent study found that on average  72% of LGBTQ people report experiencing unhealthy stress due to anti-LGBTQ hostile work environments experiencing discrimination in its many ways.

Sexuality, gender identity or expression (SOGIE) LGBTQ friendly policies and benefits have been proven to be good for business.  Naturally, around the world and Philippines being no different, there are long-standing cultural biases to move beyond and grow from.  The work that the Philippine LGBT Chamber of Commerce is doing is outstanding.

Part of that work was conducting the Philippine Corporate SOGIE Diversity & Inclusiveness Index 2018 which surveyed 100 companies which employ a total of 267,231 people.  Of the 56 companies and government agencies that responded not a single one has any form of an LGBTQ anti-discrimination policy nor did they indicate any plans to change their policies in the forthcoming 5 years.

Philippine LGBT Chamber of Commerce Report LGBTI diversity inclusivity 2

Photo via the organization’s Facebook page.

LGBTQ anti-discrimination law

Brian Tenorio, Chair of the Philippine LGBT Chamber of Commerce, said the survey was a ‘wake up call’ to enact the Philippines’, LGBTQ Anti-Discrimination Bill.  Meanwhile, Senate Bill No. 1271 has been stalling in the Senate for almost 2 years.  When passed, the new anti-discrimination law would make it illegal to deny access to public services, hire or dismiss, impede access to education, or harass a person based on sexuality, gender identity or expression.  That is and will progress considering even in the United States nearly half the states do not provide full LGBT legal protection.

Without LGBTQ anti-discrimination laws, LGBT+ professionals continue to face harassment, discrimination, prejudice, and bigotry without any recourse every day.

This report shines light on the problem and the scope.  It can be leveraged to help to create change toward equality and fair treatment of all employees.

 

Philippine LGBT Chamber of Commerce Report LGBTI diversity inclusivity

Photo via the organization’s Facebook page.

Plans for change

#ZEROto100PH plans to work hard to get 100 companies to pledge their commitment to make their businesses LGBT-inclusive with non-discrimination and equal employment policies, education, and benefits.  They will educate the companies on the benefits of being LGBTQ inclusive and welcoming and leverage international resources to make it happen.

About the LGBT Philippine Chamber of Commerce

The Philippine LGBT Chamber of Commerce is an industry organization of businesses of, by, and for the LGBT in the Philippines. The main bottom line of the organization is good business and national economic development via the efforts of its LGBT members.  They offer a diverse range of programs for their members.

About Cogencia

Based in the Philippines, Cogencia provides strategic insights to business and organizations.  Their end-to-end market, social and stakeholder services cover the entire delivery cycle from planning to implementation.  They support an organization’s effectivity, growth, and expansion through market insights, in-house research, and strategic capabilities.

 


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Point Foundation: LGBTQ Students Apply for Scholarships

Point Foundation - OutBuro LGBT Employee Company Employer Reviews GLBT Gay Professional Networking Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Queer job portal seeker communityLOS ANGELESOct. 26, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) students enrolling in undergraduate or graduate programs for the 2019-2020 academic year are encouraged to apply online for a Point Foundation Scholarship. Point Foundation (Point) is the nation’s largest scholarship-granting organization for LGBTQ students of merit and currently is providing financial assistance and programmatic support to 97 students.

Also see: LGBT Education Resources – College and University

Apply for Point Foundation scholarshipsApplications open online November 1, 2018 at www.pointfoundation.org/apply.

Students may submit their application until 11:59 p.m. PST January 28, 2019

A short application information video is available online.

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According to a survey by StudentLoanHero.com, LGBTQ students accrue $16,000 more debt on average than their heterosexual peers. Moreover, nearly a third of LGBTQ students report being discriminated against because of their gender identity or sexual orientation when seeking financial assistance for higher education. Recognizing that LGBTQ students face distinct financial disadvantages and marginalization, Point Foundation provides its scholarship recipients with mentoring and leadership development training as well as financial support.

“Despite the constant attacks on our community, our LGBTQ young people are eager to develop the skills they need to fight back against discrimination and become the leaders our country so desperately needs,” said Jorge Valencia, Executive Director & Chief Executive Officer of Point Foundation. “These students’ determination to create an equitable society that values and celebrates diversity needs to be – and can be – realized with our support.”

To receive a Point Foundation Scholarship, candidates must demonstrate academic excellence, leadership skills, community involvement, and financial need. Attention is given to applicants who have experienced marginalization and/or are working to improve the lives of marginalized groups, particularly the LGBTQ community.

Point-Foundation-2019-LGBTQ-Student-Scholarship-Past-Awardees-OutBuro-Business-News-Gay-Professional-Networking-GLBT-LGBT-Gay-Lesbian-Bisexual-Transgender-Quee

Past Point Foundation scholarship recipients

Speaking at the 2018 Point Honors Los Angeles event, Herb Hamsher Point Scholar Nia Clark, a social work student at California State University, proudly told the audience:

“I am bigger than the discrimination that threatens my black Trans existence every day. I am somebody. I’m a leader. I’m a Point Scholar. And I’m going to change the world by living authentically and unapologetically in my truth.”

Once selected, each scholar is paired with a mentor and participates in leadership development training with fellow Point Scholars. Point Scholars also give back to the LGBTQ community by completing an individual community service project each year. After graduation, scholars become part of Point’s growing alumni network, connecting them with caring individuals and professional contacts in a wide range of fields throughout the nation. Since 2002, Point has awarded more than 450 scholarships.

Individuals, corporations, and organizations can support Point’s mission by designating a scholarship with a “Name,” which recognizes the donor, an individual, or an institution. Named Scholarship donors pledge to cover the financial assistance and programmatic support Point provides its scholars. New Named Scholarships for the 2019 – 2020 academic year will include: CAA Point Scholarship; FedEx Point Scholarship; Stacy R. Friedman Point Scholarship; and the Patti Sue Mathis Point Scholarship.

The 2019 class of Point Foundation Scholarship recipients will be announced in June 2019 for LGBTQ Pride Month.

About Point Foundation
About Point Foundation: Point Foundation empowers promising LGBTQ students to achieve their full academic and leadership potential – despite the obstacles often put before them – to make a significant impact on society. Since 2002, Point has awarded more than 400 scholarships. The Foundation promotes change through scholarship funding, mentorship, leadership development and community service training. www.pointfoundation.org

Contact:
Eugene Patron
(212) 512.7807
[email protected]

SOURCE Point Foundation

Related Links

https://pointfoundation.org

 


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Best European Countries for LGBTQ Professionals to Live and Work - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Best European Countries for LGBTQ Professionals to Live and Work

Globally, gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer and heteroflexible equality rights, protections, and benefits differ greatly from country to country.  Even in the U.S. over half the states do not provide LGBTQ legal protections.   A recent study found that even being perceived as LGBTQ can impact your ability to get hired, get promoted and even if hired the salary the employer decides you are worth is typically less than what they’d offer a perceived heterosexual.

LGBTQ professionals may have great experience to bring to their next employer that is based on volunteer or paid work they performed at an LGBTQ non-profit.  The gay/lesbian professional has to decide if to be out on their resume to best represent that experience to land that new job.  They have to consider the current work environment and if the new work environment will not only a great career move but also if it will be free from harassment and discrimination.  Often they have to put up with “less will be better”.  With all the study backed data, it is no wonder that  72% of LGBTQ people report experiencing unhealthy stress due to un-supportive and sometimes hostile work environments through discrimination in its many forms. No matter the political landscape where you do business, your company can establish policies and benefits to support your LGBTQ employees and reap the benefits as a company.

Initiated by the European Court of Justice’s recent call for same-sex spouses to receive residential rights in all European countries, the study conducted an extensive review of the 26 different European countries to assess the landscape of right and quality of life for LGBTQ citizens.

Malta Number 1 Best European Country to Live and Work for LGBTQ Professionals OutBuro Gay Networking Community business news LGBT GLBT Lesbian Transgender Queer bisexual information

Malta – Number 1 Best European Country for LGBTQ Professionals to Live and Work

For this study, researchers considered a wide array of important issues such as:

  • LGBTQ inclusive employment rights
  • Laws protecting sexual orientation and gender expression
  • fair and equal housing laws
  • housing rental costs
  • LGBT hate crime rates

Top 5

  1. Malta
  2. Denmark
  3. Croatia
  4. Austria
  5. Spain

Malta – Lots of Reasons it is Number 1

Malta sored to the top of the ranking to claim the title of the best place to work and live if you’re LGBTQ+ professional.  Malta has the second lowest unemployment rate in Europe, coupled with its well-known nightlife for letting loose over the weekend.  It is one of Central Europe’s fastest growing tech scene, and the most extensive laws to protect their LGBTQ+ residents.  In addition, Malta believes in work-life balance providing the highest minimum amount of annual paid leave and bank holidays of 38 days combined.

Bottom 5

26. Latvia

25. Bulgaria

24. Italy

23. Lithuania

22. Ireland

Expert Market Research Info Graphic - Best Places to Work in Europe for LGBTQ Professionals - OutBuro Gay Business Networking Community Owner Entrepreneurs Lesbian Leaders Startup Queer

Infographic courtesy of Expert Market

From these various facts and figures, they then allocated each country with a ‘rainbow score’ to determine which would be the best options for young, travel-hungry LGBT+ professionals.

The United Kingdom also featured in the top 10, although close neighboring countries including Spain, France, and Germany all boasted a higher ‘rainbow score’ – a fact which can probably be attributed to rising rental prices and overall cost of living.

Researchers also note that city-wide legislation protecting against hate crime in the UK hasn’t been implemented nationally, also contributing to its comparatively low rating.

Meanwhile, countries like Italy – known for its repeated refusals to recognize same-sex marriage – and Latvia – officially the worst, a fact which has been acknowledged in the past – populate the bottom end of the list. Bulgaria, Lithuania, and Ireland all round out the lowest five, proving that there’s still work to be done in order to make Europe truly LGBT+-friendly.

 


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Studies Show Men Get Penalized for Not Holding to Masculine Norms in the Office - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Studies Show Men Get Penalized for Not Holding to Masculine Norms in the Office

Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer people face workplace discrimination.  When women behave in ways that don’t fit their gender stereotype they are viewed as less likable and ultimately less hirable.  Does that same hold true for men – be they heterosexual, hetero-flexible, openly gay or closeted at work?

Are men similarly penalized for straying from the strong masculine stereotype?  Yes – Simply being perceived as kind, mildly effeminate or otherwise not macho masculine or claim their feminism outlook they can have a similar discriminating result for male heterosexuals too.  Some characteristics in men that are perceived as effeminate are letting others know they stand with feminism, being a nice guy, displaying vulnerability, showing empathy toward others, expressing sadness and being modest.   These all sound like great behaviors right?   A study by the University of Surrey uncovered that just by the way someone appears and the sound of their voice, anyone, male or female can face being less likely to be hired, paid less, and not promoted. – regardless of the actual sexual orientation of the person.   This can be a problem at work for the person’s career and the advancement of the company because it discourages men from behaving in ways known to benefit their teams and productivity.

Join Now - OutBuro LGBT Employer Reviews Rating Gay Professional Network Lesbian Business Networking Diversity Recruiting Jobs Company Queer Bisexual TransgenderLet break down the traits

Being a feminist or feminine.  A large number of American men self-identify as feminist. Disturbingly, research shows that feminist men are more likely to be the victims of sexual harassment — in the forms of being the recipient of unwanted sexual advances to being told inappropriate jokes. In addition, research shows that when they work in male-dominated jobs and are perceived as too feminine men are more likely to be harassedResearch finds that men who ask for family leave, are viewed as less competent workers and are far less likely to be recommended for rewards or promotion, compared to women who take family leave.

Being a nice guy – Generally, no one likes a hostile work environment.  No one wants to work with an overbearing offensive prick right?  So we’d assume that being nice at work would be a great thing.  Nope.  Research has found that men who are warm, supportive of others, caring of others and sympathetic toward others earned significantly less money than more stereotypically masculine men to the tune of an average of 18% less in income and were evaluated as less likely to have management potential as compared to less agreeable men.  These same “good guys” were evaluated as less competent and less hirable for managerial roles. One experimental study found that male managers in consulting who tended to advocate more for their team than for themselves were judged to be lower in agency and competence and more likely to be considered for job dismissal.  Being a nice guy at work doesn’t pay and can get put them in the hunt for a new job.  This is also supported by the University of Surrey study noted above.  This seems counterproductive for the individual, teams and company bottom line.

Showing vulnerability – Men from early childhood are often taught to “be a man” – don’t cry, don’t ask for help or otherwise demonstrate vulnerability.  A set of studies from 2015 finds that when male (but not female) leaders ask for help, they are viewed as less competent, capable, and confident.  And when men make themselves vulnerable by disclosing a weakness at work, they are perceived to have lower status.  Not seeking help when you need it or admitting areas for improvement inevitably leads to mistakes, less career development, non-functional teams, and reduces the success of the projects and overall company success.

Expressing sadness/crying – American men are brought up to be to be unemotional.  Research shows that men who show sadness at work are thought of as less deserving of that emotion as compared to sad women.  No one wants to get so upset and distraught at work to the point of crying.  But for men – it can really cost them.  A study from 2017 found that men who cry at work are perceived as more emotional and less competent than women who cry.  If a man cries in response to employee performance review, they are rated as a lower performer, less likely to get promoted, and less capable as compared to women who cry in that situation.  While we don’t want men or women regularly crying at work, an authentic work environment has to allow all employees to experience the same emotions equally without negative repercussion.

Being empathic – Empathy is an important part of being a great leader. However, women are more likely to receive “credit” for it than men. A recent study found that female leaders who displayed empathy were less likely to be in danger of career derailment. In fact, for women, it can help in their career.  Men, however, do not reap the same benefits — there was no relationship between a man’s leadership empathy and their manager considering that as a factor for advancement.  These findings are far-reaching because displaying empathy is critical for leading effectively.  Empathy impacts team and client/customer success and so company success.

Exhibiting modesty – “Dude, you are just being modest.”  Research demonstrates that men who are more humble in conveying their personal success and qualifications were evaluated as less likeable, less likely to succeed, and weaker than similarly qualified modest women. Similarly, men in the interview process men who had similar qualification as others yet were more modest were evaluated by potential employers as lower in skill and ability, and less desirable to hire. Women who displayed similar qualifications and also modest faired better in the job hunt.  With the increasing awareness of the detrimental effects of narcissism at work, we should encourage men’s modesty rather than penalize it.

Can Corporations Halt the Attack on Good Guys?

Companies have a huge benefit in changing the work culture and supporting positive male behaviors.  It supports individual career growth, improves team dynamics, gender equality and success and company performance.  So what can company and organization leaders do?

Be broad and inclusive when training about gender stereotypes. Diversity training often evokes skepticism from employees, especially men. One way to address this issue is to focus on how gender stereotypes about women and men impact expectations for how they should behave. Given that white men are more likely to feel defensive when organizations provide diversity training, highlighting how men and women are both victims of gender stereotypes can help invoke compassion from all trainees.

Do not “gender police.” Gender policing means imposing normative gender expressions in terms of behavior or appearance. Research shows that trying to make men adhere to gender norms, for example, in terms of attire, is detrimental in terms of allowing men to fully express themselves at work.  When people can be themselves, it creates a place that will attract and retain top talent.

Encourage male positive behaviors. It is important for company leadership to accept and encourage positive behavior to create a safe and welcoming workspace.  For example,  the hiring process is a great place to start.  In addition, given the many benefits of humility, companies and organization should create a culture where men who are humble are praised.  Perhaps setting a “Humble Hero” quarterly employee to recognize those that make do outstanding work yet aren’t shouting about it themselves.  Organizational leaders can champion men in the organization by telling stories about how their vulnerability helped the organization perform better.

Conclusion

Companies can greatly benefit from changing it’s work culture to support a contemporary view, acceptance, and express of masculinity while still maintaining traditional expressions of masculinity such as assertiveness, responsibility, and competitiveness allowing each person to be their full selves.  This will further support gender equality and everyone thrive.

 


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Heterofexible - 29% of Young Americans Say They Are Not 100% Heterosexual - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Heterofexible – 29% of Young Americans Say They Are Not 100% Heterosexual

29% of under-30s Americans consider themselves as something other than exclusively heterosexual on the seven-point ‘Kinsey Scale’

Invented by Alfred Kinsey in the 1940s, the Kinsey scale plots individuals on a range of sexual dispositions from exclusively heterosexual at 0 through to exclusively homosexual at 6. YouGov conducted a study poll of American about their sexuality as a following on from a similar study in the UK.

  • 78% of Americans say that they are completely heterosexual while 4% say that they are completely homosexual
  • 16% of American adults say that they fall somewhere in between. In this group, the bulk (10%) say that they are more heterosexual than homosexual
  • 3% put themselves in the middle and another 3% say that they are predominantly homosexual.
  • 24% of people aged 30 to 44 say that they’re somewhere on the scale of bisexuality, compared to 8% or less of over-45s.
  • 2% of heterosexual American adults say that they have had a sexual experience with someone of the same sex.
  • A large number of Americans who classify themselves as heterosexual still admit to having had same-sex experiences.  Heterosexual identifying women (15%) are almost twice as likely as men (8%) to say that they have had a sexual encounter with someone of the same sex – at least admit it.
  • Younger Americans are noticeably less likely than their elders to put themselves in a firm category and identify as “heteroflexible”.
  • 80% of all Americans say that they are completely heterosexual or homosexual only 66% of under-30s say the same. 29% of under-30s put themselves somewhere on the category of bisexuality or heteroflexible.
  • The poll study found that the older someone is the less likely they are to say that they have fluid sexual attractions.

A similar study in the UK found that young Britons were even more likely to be sexually flexible than young Americans. Nearly half of Britons under the age of 25 say that they are some level of bisexual.

Why does this matter here at OutBüro?  Because of employment discrimination against people who do not display perceived heteronormative qualities – Study finds LGBT people less likely to be hired, paid less, and not promoted

Check out these additional resource articles:

Knowing that the younger up and coming workforce self-identify as heteroflexible should indicate a strong need for companies of all sizes to put forth a considerable effort in the diversity, inclusion, and welcoming work culture.

Check out the below article for more information:

Full poll results can be found here and topline results and margin of error here.

 


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Study Occurrences of LGBT Workplace Discrimination Cases in the USA - LGBT Employees Rate Employer Review Company Employee Branding OutBuro - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Study: Occurrences of LGBT Workplace Discrimination Cases in the USA

InsuranceQuotes - OutBuro LGBT Employee Company Employer Reviews GLBT Business News Gay Professional Networking Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Queer job portal seeker communityIn 2017, reversing prior Department of Justice policy, the Trump administration proclaimed employment discrimination protections do not extend to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in the workplace. At the same time, several lawsuits alleging employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation are winding their way through the federal court system with mixed results based on this uncertainty.  These legal disputes will continue to play out nationally as the current cases proceed as new cases are brought forth.

To examine this further, statistics from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission provides insights into complaints related to gender identity and sexual orientation in recent years. It demonstrates how LGBTQ people are increasingly willing to step forward and make formal legal complaints, the increase in frequency they happen along with their success rate at winning their discrimination cases.

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Taking a look first at geographical patterns of EEOC charges citing sexual orientation or gender identity the regional differences are easily apparent, with a heavy concentration in the Southern states. Georgia and Mississippi was near the top of the list, with roughly four charges per 100,000 residents each.  Based on those states current policy records on LGBTQ issues it’s not surprising.  These states lag far behind the rest of the country in terms of legal protections for gay. lesbian, bisexual,  transgender, queer people.

What was a bit of a surprise is that Washington, D.C., had the most complaints related to gender identity and sexual orientation per capita, even though it has a long history of activism by LGBTQ community in the nation’s capital.

LGBTQ Discrimination Charges by State - Insurance Quotes - OutBuro - LGBT Business News Information Employer Rating Gay Professional Network Lesbian Bisexual Queer Transgender Community

 

From 2014 to 2017, legal charges of discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation were significantly more common than allegations of gender identity discrimination. Thatis is not surprising and seems to reflect the relative size of the respective communities. While estimates of the transgender population vary, a greater number of people identify as gay, lesbian, or bisexual. In a small portion of cases (roughly 3%) complainants alleged both sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination together.

Check out these additional resource articles:

Cumulatively, LGBTQ-related discrimination complaints increased substantially between 2014 and 2015 and continued to rise between 2015 and 2016. In 2017, however, complaints declined slightly from 2016. That statistic provides an interesting counternarrative to research suggesting a surge in anti-LGBTQ sentiment among heterosexual people in 2017. But this decline could also be attributable to hesitation on the part of the LGBTQ community to file complaints with the EEOC, given the uncertainty of protections under the Trump administration and the media attention anti-LGBT action receives.

LGBTQ Discrimination Charges Type - Insurance Quotes - OutBuro - LGBT Business News Information Employer Rating Gay Professional Network Lesbian Bisexual Queer Transgender Community

Equality: A Work in Progress

This study suggests hundreds of thousands of people encounter workplace discrimination each year on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. Although discrimination is clearly unacceptable in any professional setting, the volume of these charges may indicate LGBTQ empowerment. Rather than suffering in silence, LGBTQ employees are making use of a valuable legal resource to claim their rights for equality. Although discrimination remains an unfortunate part of America’s employment landscape, we should celebrate those with the courage to combat it.

Join Now - OutBuro LGBT Employer Reviews Rating Gay Professional Network Lesbian Business Networking Diversity Recruiting Jobs Company Queer Bisexual TransgenderOne way to combat discrimination even if you as an employee don’t feel comfortable making is making it publically known by joining OutBüro for free, then adding the company to the directory and rating it anonymously.  Your feedback will be helpful to the company and to countless future prospective LGBT job seekers considering working there.  See this article for more information: Be a Superhero – Your Voice has the Power to Create Change

The research calls for employers to break the culture of silence that surrounds discrimination and harassment.  Check out the below article for more information:

 


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