The Reality of Mentoring Coaching lgbtq entrpreneurs startup professionals business owners careers outburo

The Reality of Mentoring/Coaching

Remember, that reaching for your dreams is a verb.  It’s action – and it’s always IN action.  Your goals and dreams may change as YOU change and grow closer to them and that’s ok. That’s part of the journey.  You can’t focus on whether or not you made it to the finish line – you need to focus on the journey, on the trip that gets you there – that’s where the greatest rewards can be found.

Sharing “Black Horizon”

Thank you to OutBuro.com for this opportunity to share my passion for creating and blending art and music.  My work is visual and audible and I try to keep my blog/website as visual and audible as possible.  Though words can be quite accurate, sometimes pictures and sounds conjure the right mood.

I try to complete a digital image based on current and past photographs every morning…a kind of meditation to start my creative day.

Black Horizon is today’s image…

Paul Lorenz American Artist
Paul Lorenz – American Artist

For  more information check out these videos:

https://www.pbs.org/video/wsiu-expressions-paul-lorenz/

To be OUT or not as LGBTQ on your Resume CV - GLBT Employee Company Ratings Branding Corporate Diversity Inclusion - OutBuro - GLBT Gay Lesbian Transgender Queer Bisexual

To be OUT or not as LGBTQ on your Resume/CV

When it’s time to update your resume/CV preparing for a job search, it can be tough to know if you should be out as LGBTQ on it. We don’t believe you will find anyone who would suggest putting “I’m queer – get used to it” in bold pink letter sprinkled with glitter on the top of your resume/CV.

So, should you come out on your resume?

No one can answer that question for you.  It is your life, your career, your sexuality, your gender identity, and therefore your choice rests squarely on your shoulders.  However, read on for insights to help you make an informed decision.

Many in the LGBTQ community disagree about what you should reveal on your resume/CV.  Some say to be out being your full and authentic self, while others argue that you should remain in the closet, grit your teeth to land the job and then slowly come out to co-workers as you get to know them individually.

Many people have acquired significant volunteer and work experience from obviously LGTBQ-oriented organizations. Other people struggle with how transparent they should be on their resume or job application when asked about other interests. Knowing what to say, and how much to disclose to a complete stranger with the power to provide or decline a job offer can be cause for worry. It can often feel like living in the closet and being judged for who you are as a person.

How much experience is related?

Not much but it’s close to my heart

You are such a wonderful person for volunteering. If your past experience related to LGBTQ non-profits/NGOs is not really central to the job you are applying for, we’d recommend completely leaving it off your resume/CV. It’s not hiding your sexuality or gender identity, it is just not pertinent. This even includes leaving it out of your resume/CV hobbies/extra activities. If you get a sense during the interview process that the employer and interviewers are LGBTQ friendly you can always bring it up in the course of dialog as appropriate.

Just a bit but it’s important

If some of your experience was acquired from paid or volunteering for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer non-profits/NGOs no matter if you are LGBTQ a straight ally you might start to wonder if you should put that experience on your resume.  This effectively would out you as LGBTQ whether you are LGBTQ or a community ally. Additionally, as you’ll learn below even just the perception of being LGBTQ real or perceived can potentially impact your ability to be hired, promoted and even the salary offered. 

Major part of my career

If all your experience is from paid or volunteering at LGBTQ organizations, then it’s pretty clear you have no choice. You have to list the experiences.  But you still need to be aware of the issues you may face and be prepared to research employers to find the right match and put your best foot forward with the best employers no matter the size or location of the employer.  

If you have worked primarily for LGBTQ or other non-profits/NGOs it can also be difficult to break into the for-profit sector. I have heard of people attempting to do make this transition and being told, “Your qualifications are outstanding, however, you aren’t a right fit for this company we are about making money not helping people/the environment/animals.” – true story. So if your work experience has been 50%+ with a non-profit organization no matter the focus LGBTQ or not, be prepared to address this disqualifying mindset proactively in your cover letter and in the every interview conversation if you get that far.

LGBTQ workplace policies are good yet not a 100% guarantee

Reality is even if an employer boasts being a welcoming LGBTQ workplace with LGBT friendly policies and benefits, there are many people involved in the resume/cv review and interview process.  Depending on the size of the employer, that may be a few people or in best case scenario it will be a review committee to reduce the chances of one person’s learned prejudices and ignorance to discriminate and disqualify you based on you being LGBT.  In any case, it still can be risky. You want to list all your great experience and qualifications to land that new job yet you are also putting trust in the employer company/organization and the individuals in the hiring process.

At what point should I come “out” in the workplace?

It is important to know that you do NOT have to disclose your sexual orientation or gender identity at any point in the resume/cv submission, job application or interview process. This decision is entirely up to you and how comfortable you feel disclosing your sexual orientation, sex, or gender expression. If you do choose to disclose, there are generally three opportunities to “come out” to an employer?

  • On your resume
  • In an interview
  • After you start working for the organization

Many believe that no job is so great that it’s worth hiding who you are and selling yourself short by leaving out all the organizations you volunteered time with, just-just to hide your sexual identity. That volunteer work could have provided many skills and demonstrate your community involvement beyond the workplace showing a well-rounded individual with character.

Some feel that it is more important to get the job first, and then come out after people get to know you. “I’m here. I’m queer. I’m in the next cubicle” approach.

Others strive for a middle ground in where they list their LGBT activities on their resumes but don’t draw attention to it. They might list PFLG, HRC or NGLCC without going into additional details or spelling out the acronym. They might list the abbreviation of a student campus LGBT group and that they were the vice president such as Berkely LGSA Vice President instead of Berkely Lesbian & Gay Student Alliance Vice President. If asked about the entry it’s an opportunity for discussion to expand upon it in person versus potentially being tossed way by someone along the candidate review path who might hold prejudices. such as “vice president of gay campus group.” The rest, says Woog, is left to the interviewer. If she says, “The Rainbow Alliance –- tell me more about that,” it’s an opportunity to expand on it and judge her reaction.

Still, others hold firm that it is inappropriate to come out on one’s resume as it is to mark down one’s religious or political affiliations. We suggest talking with your both LGBT and straight close friends and family who also have a history of volunteer and community work.

As LGBTQ professionals we cannot live in a vacuum and our straight college have no problem listing their volunteer and community activities that might hint at their heterosexuality. It’s accepted.

At OutBüro we believe a resume should be honest and comprehensive. If a person has done work with GLAAD or Lambda Legal for example – and the reader even knows what these things are – certain presumptions can be made or not. We know many straight people who work at LGBTQ organizations too. Putting your volunteer work in the LGBTQ community on your resume is no different than others who may indicate they are a deacon in the church or a Hebrew school teacher on the weekends.

Why should you hide what you value and has contributed to your life, character, your local community and the community at large? It’s unfortunate that all companies do not have sexual orientation and gender identity non-discrimination policies. Luckily many companies and organizations do

Questions to ask

  • Is the company you are interested in an LGBTQ workplace friendly employer?
  • Do you feel comfortable disclosing that you are currently or have in your past held a paid positions or volunteered for an LGBT community organization?
  • Do you include previous work experiences (internships, etc.) that occurred at an LGBT advocacy organization(s)?
  • Is that current or past experience relevant to the job you are applying for?
  • How do you list your achievements from an LGBT organization on your resume?
  • Do you list it as for example an LGBT youth organization or simply a youth organization and if asked which one in the interview process disclose it if you feel comfortable doing so at that time?

Questions you can ask an employer in an interview if their employer website does not specifically state it:

  • Would you say that your company has a diverse employee base?
  • Do you offer domestic partner benefits and or other LGBT related benefits and policies? (if not clearly stated on their website)
  • Does your company/organization have an LGBTQ employee resource support or social group?

Additional considerations for transgender job seekers

Is it OK to use my chosen name on a resume and cover letters are not legal documents? You are not required to list your legal name on either document.

Let’s say your legal name is Stephanie Smith and your chosen name is Darrel Smith. You might consider listing your name as S. Darrel Smith on the resume and cover letter.

Will I have to use my legal name during the Job Search

Unless you have made legal arrangements to change your name, unfortunately, you will need to provide your legal name for the actual job application, background checks, social security documents, and insurance forms. However, most organizations will allow you to use your preferred name for company contact information, email, and phone directory. Human resource professionals are bound by confidentiality and can be a good source of information.

When it comes to dressing for an interview, it is important that you present yourself in a manner that is consistent with the position for which you are applying. Dress professionally for the gender for which you wish to be seen as. This can also help your employer understand which pronouns you wish to use.

The world has changed but not enough

A recent study conducted by the University of Surry demonstrates that discrimination in the hiring process still exists.  In that study the presented the participants with headshot images with the backgrounds removed along with voice samples.  The found that just based on those two bits of information that the participants indicated they were less likely to hire the person and if they did hire them the candidate would be offered less money for the same job with the same skills as someone they perceived as heterosexual.  Additionally, the participants indicated if the candidate already worked for the employer, they would likely be passed over for promotion preferring to promote a heterosexual.

According to a 2013 Queer in STEM study (science, technology, engineering, and math) found that more than 40% of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer people are not out as LGBTQ in the workplace.

One-third of out American physicists have been told to stay in the closet to continue their career as found in the 2014 Factors Impacting The Academic Climate study.  Half of the transgender or gender non-conforming physicists were harassed in academia (2015 American Physical Society survey).

In the United States laws to protect LGBTQ workers is still spotty today leaving LGBTQ citizens open to blatant discrimination and harassment. This leads to the findings that in the United States alone, nearly 72% of LGBTQ employees suffer mental stress from a workplace that is not LGBTQ friendly or welcoming.

Regardless of actual sexual orientation, another study found that men who do not conform to the stereotypical masculine norm they are penalized by being left out, not promoted and seen as weak.  When women behave in ways that don’t fit their gender stereotype they are viewed as less likable and ultimately less hirable.

Studies find benefits to creating an LGBTQ inclusive workplace

All the while other studies have demonstrated that having LGBTQ in management positions benefits the company/organization.   Further many studies have been done the clearly indicate that companies/organization that create an LGBTQ inclusive workplace benefit from increased productivity, increase employee happiness, increased customer satisfaction and increased revenue.  It’s a win-win-win opportunity for employers who adopt LGBTQ inclusive policies, benefits, and business practices.

Know the LGBTQ legal protections where you live

No matter how you decide to proceed regarding your sexual orientation on your resume, you should do your homework on the employer’s LGBTQ workplace equality you before submitting your application.

Do research on the company’s website as well as other websites listing the company is important to know as much about them and their LGBTQ stance as possible. Know what legal protections are in place in your city, county, state, and country.

Network with other LGBT professionals of all levels

One of the best ways to get the inside scoop on an employer’s workplace LGBT friendliness is to connect with and communicate with an LGBT employee who currently or recently worked there. Don’t know anyone? No problem. Join the OutBüro on the LinkedIn LGBT professional networking group. It was the first and remains the largest LGBT+ professional networking group on LinkedIn with currently over 46,000 global members.

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Like the OutBüro Facebook page and message others who like it. We’ll be considering starting an OutBüro on Facebook group shortly and then you’ll be right there ready to jump in.

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LGBTQ employer ratings/reviews

The main focus of OutBüro is to be a growing resource for LGBTQ job seekers to use the site to research LGBTQ inclusive and friendly potential employers. 

Add LGBTQ Employer Listing Ratings Reviews OutBuro - GBLT Employees Rate Reviews Company Employee Branding - Corporate Workplace Equality Gay Lesbian Queer Diversity Inclusion

Any company/organization

Any size.

Any location in the world

Your voice matters

It needs people just like you to participate. It’s fairly new and we would appreciate you taking a few moments to add reviews/rating of your current and recent past employers. It’s at no cost to you as an employee and it’s anonymous. Your review/rating will help other LGBTQ job seekers in the future during their job hunt company/organization research.

Search to see if your current or recent past employer(s) are present already in the system. If not, you may add it with limited features and then review/rate them.

Check out the below article and user guides to get started:

In the United States

HRC

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If interested in a job at a US Fortune 1000 level company one source is the HRC Corporate Equality Index. This organization and report have been instrumental in moving large companies forward in creating LGBTQ workplace equality. It is however as mentioned limited only to US Fortune 1000. It is also self-reported by those company HR departments with no employee input to our knowledge and definitely, no direct employee feedback on the actual workplace equality and general work culture.

Although not all, OutBüro has heard personally from many LGBT employees over the past few years that once their employer achieved the coveted 100% HRC Corporate Equality Index score that management backs off and the internal efforts dwindle to barely an acceptable level at best. It is awesome and we applaud HRC and all organizations who have achieved and maintain a 100% score. This report is but one view of the employer’s benefits, policies, business practices, and the potential of an LGBT friendly workplace environment. Don’t rely on it as your only.

If outside the United States

As of the updating of this LGBT employee resource article, OutBüro is only aware of one other corporate equality scoring report.

If you are aware of other studies and reports please contact us with a URL to the site so that we may include it within this article and other resource guides on the OutBüro site.

Rainbow Tick

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The Rainbow Tick is a New Zealand national accreditation program for organizations that are committed to safe and inclusive practice, and service delivery for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex (LGBTI) people. Organizations wishing to receive a Rainbow Tick are required to undergo accreditation against the Rainbow Tick Standards, owned and developed by Rainbow Health Victoria (formerly GLHV).

Stonewall UK Workplace Equality Index

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Participating employers demonstrate their work in 10 areas of employment policy and practice. Staff from across the organization also complete an anonymous survey about their experiences of diversity and inclusion at work.

Organizations then receive their scores, enabling them to understand what’s going well and where they need to focus their efforts, as well as see how they’ve performed in comparison with their sector and region. The 100 best-performing organizations are celebrated publicly.

Stonewall Diversity Champions benefit from in-depth, tailored feedback on their submission. 

Free & Equal – United Nations

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Violence and discrimination against lesbian, gay, bi, trans and intersex (LGBTI) people cannot be ended by governments alone. Businesses can foster diversity and promote a culture of respect and equality both in the workplace and in the communities where they and their business partners operate. 

The United Nations is calling on companies all over the world – big and small, local and multinational – to help move the dial in the direction of greater equality for LGBTI people.

We know from experience that every time discrimination is diminished, everyone benefits. 

Conclusion

It’s your life, your sexuality, your gender identity, and your career. Only you can make the choice on how out to be on your resume/CV in your new career job search and in the workplace. It’s your choice.

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The Gay Veteran Entrepreneur Behind LinkedIn’s Largest LGBT Professional Group

By Andy Smith – Updated May 14, 2019, for current accuracy by Dennis Velco.

First appearing on Edge Media Network

Since 2008, Dennis Velco founded and has nurtured  LinkedIn’s largest LGBTQ networking group from a concept to an international networking resource with over 46,000 global members – that grows daily.  Velco is a social entrepreneur with a passion for the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer community. OutBuro on LinkedIn 46000 global members- Largest LGBT Professional Entrepreneur Networking Community Group Gay Lesbian Bisexual Queer Transgender Network

It was the driving force for Velco to launch the LGBT media crowd-sourced corporate social justice tech startup OutBüro.  Additionally, OutBüro is a growing site of LGBT related business news, information, resources, and stories of careers and business owners.

Velco continues to moderate and grow the LinkedIn group yet now branded as and supported as a service of OutBüro.

For Dennis, creating, cultivating and growing the OutBüro on LinkedIn group has been a persistent and passionate endeavor.

OutBüro on LinkedIn welcomes gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender (GLBT), queer, intersex and questioning professionals and entrepreneurs, along with friends, allies, recruiters and diversity professionals seeking to connect, network and communicate to advance their careers.

A Persistent Pioneer – How it began

“I’ve been on LinkedIn since way before people knew what it was, when I was living in New York City 16 years ago,” says Velco, now based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. “Back then it wasn’t as prominent as it is today. I put it on the backburner for a couple of years. As more clients began to mention it in casual conversation in late in 2007, I got more involved and did what most people do-I filled it out like a resume and began to prospect on it.”

As he became more involved, Velco began noticing other features of the networking service, especially the preponderance of collegiate alumni association groups listed on people’s profiles.

“I scoured LinkedIn searching for an LGBT Group and looking up very prominent LGBT community members to see if their profiles had any LGBT group listed. I found nothing,” he says. After several patient inquiries and a few months of back and forth, it turned out the site wasn’t hosting an LGBTQ networking group.

Velco contacted LinkedIn providing a strong case for an LGBT group on the site. Eventually, LinkedIn gave the green light, and Velco agreed to be the group’s owner and moderator voluntarily donating his time and resources.

He approached the project with fervor and a sense of mission. “I felt and continue to feel it is vital to have a strong open and out LGBT presence on the world’s largest professional networking site,” he says. “People are much more likely to be out on Facebook yet still hesitant to be out on LinkedIn.” At Velco’s request, all groups on LinkedIn offer the option to hide a group’s membership on public profiles.

Adding Members & Content 

Once LinkedIn signed off, Velco jumped in with both feet, embracing the project, donating hours of time each day – including weekends – to building the group, taking a labor-intensive, trial-and-error approach.

“I would search LinkedIn and find profiles of people that had ‘LGBT, GLBT, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Queer and so forth’ in their listing and send them invitations to join the group. I’d have to be careful to weed out people who have ‘Gay’ in their names,” he says. “I then would send each person a personalized invitation to join the group.”

Building and maintaining this group has been a labor of love. “My past life partner thought I was crazy in the beginning of building it due to the amount of time and personal money I was investing in the group. The first several years I would spend anywhere from two to six hours a day combing the Internet for pertinent content to post,” Velco recalls.

“March 2018 will mark ten years that I’ve done this voluntarily,” he says.

In addition to writing pieces for the group, Velco searched international news sites to curate LGBTQ-focused, business-oriented pieces. “I would strive to stay non-political and avoid content that would alienate members,” he says. “I’d try to get global content because I didn’t want it to just be an echo chamber of U.S. and Canadian content. I can’t wait until LinkedIn gets automatic translations because I would like all members to be able to contribute, view and participate in their native language. I believe that being an English only site is a deterrent to many. Having such a feature I believe would increase member active participation.”

Nixing NSFW Content

Despite what a handful of aspiring members might think, LinkedIn is not an adjunct to Grindr or a Circuit Party Facebook page. Deflecting accusations of being sex-negative, Velco has spent a fair amount of time screening out applicants who submit genital images as their profile photos. As a business-oriented (rather than social) site, even shirtless pictures are typically verboten.

“Policing the group is important because while Facebook is typically banned at most businesses via the company internet, LinkedIn is not,” he emphasizes.  I want OutBüro main site and our channels such as OutBüro on LinkedIn to remain Fortune 1000 level office friendly.

“I hold to LinkedIn’s terms of service. I’ve had to moderate and get involved with spats and even had a stalker who ended up banned from LinkedIn for life. I’ve had blatant anti-LGBT content in profiles. Every single person’s profile in the group must be reviewed by me to a degree.”

Worthy Endeavors 

Today he’s exploring his new home town of Wilton Manors and the Fort Lauderdale, Florida area.

The group has from high school students through White House staff of both the Obama and Trump administration and every role in between. “Knowing that people at that level value the group enough to have an open LGBT or they are friendly representatives present makes me feel great.  My effort to date has been well spent.”

Nevertheless, Dennis and his passionate quest continue with OutBüro being part of the evolution.  He states, “I feel good because OutBüro is about helping people and companies/organization be better and make good decisions be being a resource and a tool of communication, growth, and change.”

Directly connect with Dennis Velco on LinkedIn.  Use the contact form to send a message or request a 30-minute phone or skype introduction call with him.

Join the LinkedIn LGBT group here.

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Incarcerated. Gang Raped. Abused. Tortured. Future?

Since recently relocating to the Fort Lauderdale area I have begun to get to know many wonderful people. A new friend, Scott Bowker, invited me the April 29th, Fort Lauderdale premier of the new documentary titled “Where Justice Ends: Where punishment for gender identity is cruel but not unusual.” Shown at the historic Classic Gateway Theater.

Produced by George Zuber, President of Buddha Dog Productions also based in Fort Lauderdale. The documentary was simply captivating and alarming as 6 transgender women share their stories of being incarcerated. Their stories are a collective of mental and physical abuse, torture, blatant denial of safety, and medical care. Some live quietly and others have the amazing perseverance to be instruments of change. Some struggling with how to move on at so many levels from dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and trying to find and/or build a solid steady legal income.

Along with anther 16 interviewees, the 6 women featured are:

More information on them here.

Human Rights Watch involvement

Attending the event was Carine Chehad, Miami Director, Human Rights Watch. Chehad stated that the Human Rights Watch has been around for quite some time but that once this administration started showing itself that the Human Rights Watch started to focus on the United States. She further stated that it is now one of the Human Rights Watch largest operation.

How I identified

Although I’m a cis-gender gay male, I could identify in several not pleasent ways. That comonality however helped me understand and empathize with these women. Although right now single in Wilton Manors, Florida, one of the gay capitals of the USA, my life has taken me all over the US and some of Europe. During those travels while just trying to not live in my hotel room due to business travels, I would go out for conversation.

On more than one occasion I’ve been raped by one and more than one guy. I was drunk and/or drugged. I was not completely coherent to give consent or purposely drugged to render me not capable of consent for fighting back.

I have a safety word and have for years due to this. If I say it, and it’s not honored prepare, if I am mentally able and physically able, to receive a stern punch in the nose with an upward motion or short hard chop to the throat.

I cannot imagine the additional issues of being incarcerated, trapped, completely aware, coherent of those actions.

After my divorce of a 17-year relationship almost 2 years ago I got into a bit of trouble. I was used to having a cocktail or 3 at home – not out. I got DUI’s. Yes. Two. Luckily my seconds was in Pinellas County with a Veterans Program. I was fortunate. I didn’t have those experiences in Pinellas or Polk County jails. But the potential was there. I was scared, frighted, came close to a knockdown twice. I cannot fathom the amount of fear, anguish and terror these women must have felt and gone through.

How Those Affected Move Forward

I’m not attempting to diminish by any stretch. Everyone has different ways of dealing with trauma. Most don’t get the mental or physical health treatment they need. It’s not what has been done to us that defines us. It’s what we do with it. It’s how much do we allow it to eat us up or surrender and focus on the positive in life and what you can do with it.

That’s one of the things that stuck with me is how difficult it is not only here in the United States but around the world to get good meaningful employment as a transgender. A few months ago I introduced you to Kinner – Empowering Lives and Dignity with Every Bottle of Water in India. Also how LGBT discrimination leads to limited healthcare for many. In the US workplace, men are penalized for not holding traditional masculine norms. Coupling that with often family abandonment, friends lost due to lack of understanding and lots of other complicated issues adding going to a local jail or prison adds additional burdens of trying to build a healthy, full and prosperous life of meaning and dignity.

For those finding it difficult to find employment maybe start your own business or organization. Have a purpose while doing other jobs if necessary until your passion becomes a fully financially supporting enterprise. Find some resources here on OutBüro.

Realize your value in your experiences. Value yourself and what you have to offer. Be true to yourself first, then others. Believe in yourself and take actions toward your vision. When you do; magic and miracle happen.

Wishing you all the best and if there’s anything I can do and have the ability to do via myself or with others let me know.